Artificial Intelligence and the Anatomy of The (Healthy) Future

#artificialintelligence

For those of you unfamiliar with my work, I write frequently about Fourth Industrial Revolution (#4IR) themes such as Tech Innovation, Agtech, and Industrial Disruption. If I had to pick one area I find most exciting, most potentially disruptive and thus the best opportunity for return on investment, it would be A.I. Artificial Intelligence is the brain that makes everything work. It's easy to get lost in #4IR Tech Innovation jargon with complex topics such as: Artificial Intelligence (A.I.), Augmented Intelligence, Deep Learning, Machine Learning, Neural Networks Internet of Things (IOT), Internet of Industrial Things (IOIT), IOE (Internet of Everything) Blockchain, Fintech, Mobile Payments, Cryptocurrencies, Bitcoin Big Data, Data Science, Data Mining: Especially for Healthcare and Agriculture Cybersecurity, Cyber Terrorism, Hacking, Asymmetrical Warfare Smart Cities, Smart Grid, Energy Storage, Portable Power 3D and 4D Printing: BioPrinting, Cloud Manufacturing, Bionics, and printing objects that assemble and reshape themselves over time Industrial Revolution says that, ultimately, the innovation leads to disruption, change, and economic unrest… but also leads to a new era of opportunity and invention. Or is it the other way around? The anatomy of infrastructure is not unlike that of the human body, and we all know it's possible to live long, healthy lives.


[session] #IoT Devices and #Cybersecurity @ThingsExpo @Battelle #AI #M2M

#artificialintelligence

Cybersecurity is a critical component of software development in many industries including medical devices. However, code is not always written to be robust or secure from the unknown or the unexpected. This gap can make medical devices susceptible to cybersecurity attacks ranging from compromised personal health information to life-sustaining treatment. In his session at @ThingsExpo, Clark Fortney, Software Engineer at Battelle, will discuss how programming oversight using key methods can increase the cybersecurity of medical device code to prevent weaknesses and vulnerabilities from being introduced into a device. These include automatic code scanners, runtime analysis, following coding standards, and binary analysis tools to monitor for unexpected behavior.


Cybersecurity, Is there Light at the End of The Tunnel in 2018?

#artificialintelligence

The volume of data breaches continued to climb from the already alarming experiences of previous years. The sophistication and intensity of cyberattacks from social engineering, ransomware, and DDOS attacks also experienced exponential growth. The question remains, what should we expect (or fear) in 2018? Succinctly, in 2017, globally there were a total of 5,207 breaches and 7.89 billion information records compromised. Eight of 2017's reported data breaches made the Top 20 list of all-time largest breaches.


Machine learning and big data know it wasn't you who just swiped your credit card

#artificialintelligence

You're sitting at home minding your own business when you get a call from your credit card's fraud detection unit asking if you've just made a purchase at a department store in your city. It wasn't you who bought expensive electronics using your credit card – in fact, it's been in your pocket all afternoon. So how did the bank know to flag this single purchase as most likely fraudulent? Credit card companies have a vested interest in identifying financial transactions that are illegitimate and criminal in nature. According to the Federal Reserve Payments Study, Americans used credit cards to pay for 26.2 billion purchases in 2012.


Chinese Government Considers Using Blockchain for Big Data Audits - Cryptovest

#artificialintelligence

China's National Audit Office decided to break from traditionally centralized methods to audit the enormous troves of data it needs to sift through and turned its eyes towards blockchain technology. "At present, audit data is managed using a centralized storage method, which is first collected by the accredited agencies to audit objects, then uploaded to the Audit Office Data Center, and then centrally managed by the [AODC]. The accredited agencies do not store the relevant data. Though this management model has a high level of data security and legitimacy, it also results in the infinite expansion of data center hardware and software equipment requirements. It will never be able to satisfy the endless cycle of data storage and management, resulting in more data center workload," the organization wrote in a published memo.