Stanford team develops high speed brain interface

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Researchers have developed a new interface that allows people with paralysis to communicate faster than ever through brain-controlled typing. The system uses tiny electrode implants, each roughly the size of a baby aspirin, to move an on-screen cursor when a person imagines their own hand movements. According to the Stanford-led team, the system marks a'major milestone' in efforts to improve life for those with severe limb weakness and paralysis, including people with ALS and spinal cord injuries. Researchers have developed a new interface that allows people with paralysis to communicate faster than ever through brain-controlled typing. In the new study, the Stanford-led team used an intracortical brain-computer interface called the BrainGate Neural Interface System.


Are brain implants the future of thinking?

#artificialintelligence

Almost two years ago, Dennis Degray sent an unusual text message to his friend. "You are holding in your hand the very first text message ever sent from the neurons of one mind to the mobile device of another," he recalls it read. Degray, 66, has been paralysed from the collarbones down since an unlucky fall over a decade ago. He was able to send the message because in 2016 he had two tiny squares of silicon with protruding metal electrodes surgically implanted in his motor cortex, the part of the brain that controls movement. By imagining moving a joystick with his hand, he is able to move a cursor to select letters on a screen.


Are brain implants the future of thinking?

#artificialintelligence

Almost two years ago, Dennis Degray sent an unusual text message to his friend. "You are holding in your hand the very first text message ever sent from the neurons of one mind to the mobile device of another," he recalls it read. Degray, 66, has been paralysed from the collarbones down since an unlucky fall over a decade ago. He was able to send the message because in 2016 he had two tiny squares of silicon with protruding metal electrodes surgically implanted in his motor cortex, the part of the brain that controls movement. By imagining moving a joystick with his hand, he is able to move a cursor to select letters on a screen.


Implants enable richer communication for people with paralysis

Engadget

John Scalzi's science fiction novel Lock In predicts a near future where people with complete body paralysis can live meaningful, authentic lives thanks to (fictional) advances in brain-computer interfaces. A new study by researchers at Stanford University might be the first step towards such a reality. Using brain-computer interfaces (BCI) to help people with paralysis communicate isn't completely new. But getting people using it to have a complex conversation is. This study's participants were able to output words at a much faster, more accurate rate than ever recorded thanks to the advanced technique.


Mind-reading typing tool for paralysed people is fastest yet

New Scientist

Three people with paralysis have learned to type by thought alone using a brain implant โ€“ at the fastest speeds recorded using such a system. Two have motor neurone disease, also known as ALS โ€“ a degenerative disorder that destroys neurons associated with movement โ€“ while the other has a spinal cord injury. All three have weakness or paralysis in all of their limbs. There is a chance that those with ALS will eventually lose the ability to speak, too, says Jaimie Henderson, a neurosurgeon at Stanford University Medical Center in California. People who have lost the ability to talk may be offered devices that allow them to select letters on a screen using head, cheek or eye movements.