Brain-Computer Interfaces Are Already Here - Robot Watch

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For the first 54 years of his life, Dennis DeGray was an active guy. In 2007 he was living in Pacific Grove, Calif., not far from the ocean and working at a beachside restaurant. Then, while taking out the trash one rainy night, he slipped, fell, and hit his chin on the pavement, snapping his neck between the second and third vertebrae. DeGray was instantly rendered, as he puts it, "completely nonfunctional from the collarbone south." He's since depended on caregivers to feed, clothe, and clean him and meet most any other need.


The future we've been waiting for is already here

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CBS Interactive and VICE Media have good news for us: The future we've all been waiting for – the one we've been increasingly impatient for – has already arrived. The increasingly powerful promises of artificial intelligence, bots, and virtual and augmented reality have been whipping technophiles and pundits alike into something akin to a frenzy, if all those thinkpieces that link current innovations to the magic or sci-fi blockbusters are any indication. And now these companies have paired up to capture that zeitgeist, creating and producing "Dear Future," a long-form journalism series that promises to bring readers dispatches from the cutting edge. In an effort to marry Motherboard's voice with CNET's tech focus, "Dear Future" will tackle the big, science-fiction-becomes-fact stuff. The pledge is a series of stories that demonstrate how today's technology is already impacting our present.


Are brain implants the future of thinking?

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Almost two years ago, Dennis Degray sent an unusual text message to his friend. "You are holding in your hand the very first text message ever sent from the neurons of one mind to the mobile device of another," he recalls it read. Degray, 66, has been paralysed from the collarbones down since an unlucky fall over a decade ago. He was able to send the message because in 2016 he had two tiny squares of silicon with protruding metal electrodes surgically implanted in his motor cortex, the part of the brain that controls movement. By imagining moving a joystick with his hand, he is able to move a cursor to select letters on a screen.


Are brain implants the future of thinking?

#artificialintelligence

Almost two years ago, Dennis Degray sent an unusual text message to his friend. "You are holding in your hand the very first text message ever sent from the neurons of one mind to the mobile device of another," he recalls it read. Degray, 66, has been paralysed from the collarbones down since an unlucky fall over a decade ago. He was able to send the message because in 2016 he had two tiny squares of silicon with protruding metal electrodes surgically implanted in his motor cortex, the part of the brain that controls movement. By imagining moving a joystick with his hand, he is able to move a cursor to select letters on a screen.


Raising the bar for clinical research

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Continuing our current practice and in alignment with guidance from the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE), all interventional clinical trials must be prospectively registered in a publicly available database that meets ICMJE standards. Prospective registration ensures transparency in clinical research. It discourages selective reporting of results, reduces research waste and, importantly, it provides patients, physicians and the public with access to information about ongoing clinical studies in which they might wish to participate. In the spirit of promoting transparency in reporting, registration of other study types, such as observational cohorts and meta-analyses, is encouraged but not required. To enable adequate evaluation of clinical studies by editors and referees, it is critical that authors also provide the approved study protocol with the manuscript at submission; and for trials registered at the start of 2019 and going forward, a data-sharing plan must be included in the trial registration as well as in the manuscript.