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Top plastic surgery trends

FOX News

According to a new report, more Americans are going under the knife and using their own fat to improve their appearances. And, for the first time, labiaplasty -- a procedure that involves rejuvenating the labia through lifting, or by injecting fat or filler into the area -- was included in the annual results from the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS). Overall, the data revealed that 17.1 million surgical and minimally invasive cosmetic procedures were performed in 2016. Cosmetic surgical procedures increased by 4 percent, compared with minimally invasive cosmetic procedures, which grew by 3 percent. "One trend we are seeing with fat involves an increase in fat grafting procedures," Dr. Debra Johnson, president of the ASPS, said in a news release.


For Cervical Cancer Patients, Less Invasive Surgery Is Worse For Survival

NPR Technology

Cancer of the cervix is one of the most common cancers affecting women and can be fatal. Here, cervical cancer cells are dividing, as seen through a colored scanning electron micrograph. Cancer of the cervix is one of the most common cancers affecting women and can be fatal. Here, cervical cancer cells are dividing, as seen through a colored scanning electron micrograph. A treatment for early stage cervical cancer that has rapidly gained acceptance in the United States turns out to be worse than standard surgery, according to two studies.


How a McKinsey co-designed robot is creating a better future for minimally invasive surgery

#artificialintelligence

February 12, 2020When German internist and surgeon Georg Kelling performed the first laparoscopic surgery in 1901, he likely hadn't envisioned that machines would one day follow in his footsteps. But today, robotic surgery is a health-care reality that promises certain benefits, like improved surgical precision that can contribute to quicker patient healing times. Still, widespread adoption of the technology has remained elusive. "The traditional approach to robotic surgery brings with it a lot of complexity and high cost," says Marcus Heneen, a design director at McKinsey Design. Today's surgical robots, Marcus explains, tend to situate the surgeon at a console in a non-sterile environment away from the patient.


Machine learning-guided channelrhodopsin engineering enables minimally invasive optogenetics

#artificialintelligence

We thank Twist Bioscience for synthesizing and cloning ChR sequences, D. Wagenaar (California Institute of Technology) and the Caltech Neurotechnology Center for building the mouse treadmill, J. Brake (California Institute of Technology) for performing spectrometer measurements, J. Bedbrook for critical reading of the manuscript and the Gradinaru and Arnold laboratories for helpful discussions. This work was funded by the Institute for Collaborative Biotechnologies grant no. W911NF-09-0001 from the US Army Research Office (F.H.A) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) (V.G.): NIH BRAIN grant no. RF1MH117069, NIH Director's Pioneer Award grant no. DP1NS111369, NIH Director's New Innovator Award grant no.


Health Checkup: Robotics - TIME

AITopics Original Links

If your idea of surgery comes mainly from TV-doctor dramas, you'll find this operating suite at the Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit a bit disorienting. There's a major surgery in progress that's what they tell you, anyway but you can't see a patient. For that matter, you can't see the surgeon. There must be a scalpel wielder here somewhere, but all you can see is people sitting at machines in near darkness. The largest of the machines is a weird behemoth in the center of the room, spiderlike, shrouded in plastic sleeves and protective drapery.