Goto

Collaborating Authors

Hackers Could Turn LG Smart Appliances Into Remote-Controlled Spy Robot

@machinelearnbot

If your smart devices are smart enough to make your life easier, then their smart behaviour could also be exploited by hackers to invade your privacy or spy on you, if not secured properly. Recent research conducted by security researchers at threat prevention firm Check Point highlights privacy concern surrounding smart home devices manufactured by LG. Check Point researchers discovered a security vulnerability in LG SmartThinQ smart home devices that allowed them to hijack internet-connected devices like refrigerators, ovens, dishwashers, air conditioners, dryers, and washing machines manufactured by LG. ...and what's worse? Hackers could even remotely take control of LG's Hom-Bot, a camera-equipped robotic vacuum cleaner, and access the live video feed to spy on anything in the device's vicinity. This hack doesn't even require hacker and targeted device to be on the same network.


Newegg's dropped $20 off the third-generation Nest thermostat

PCWorld

Newegg has a deal that offers a smarter way to turn down the heat as we move from winter to spring. The online retailer is selling the third-generation Nest Learning Thermostat for $230. That's $20 off the typical price you'll find elsewhere, and though it's not a huge price cut, we haven't seen the Nest Thermostat on sale since Target's 15 percent off coupon deal from last month and the holiday season prices before that. This third-gen Nest Thermostat features a larger LCD screen with a 2.08-inch diameter and 480-by-480 resolution, and comes packed with a variety of sensors to help monitor your home while you're there or away. It also lights up when you enter a room using its Farsight technology, which can detect presence from farther away than previous models.


LG SmartThinQ: Smart Appliances for a Smart Connected Home

#artificialintelligence

Boost your home's IQ with state-of-the-art SmartThinQ appliances from LG. This innovative smart home technology will change the way you run your home, while taking the efficiency and convenience of your LG appliances to new heights. Now you can create a truly connected home, including your kitchen, living room, laundry room and more--and control it all in the palm of your hand! Imagine using your smartphone to pre-heat the oven before you leave work, or to make a fresh batch of ice before company arrives. Forget to turn on that load of dirty clothes in the washer?


Petnet SmartFeeder review: Robot pet feeder meets smartphone app with mostly good results

PCWorld

When I first heard about the Petnet SmartFeeder, I bristled. How could something so basic as feeding a pet be in search of a smart solution? I deposit a half-cup of dry kibble in my dog's bowl twice daily--done and done. Is no human endeavor sacred? I can see that there are times when an automatic pet feeder makes sense: an unpredictable work schedule, say, or an impromptu invite, either of which could step on the toes of your pet's meal time.


Aquanta and its smart water-heater controller are back with new promises to slash your energy bill

PCWorld

According to the U.S. Department of Energy, heating water accounts for fully 18 percent of the typical household's annual energy consumption, second only to the amount of energy consumed to heat and cool their residence. And because the typical tank water heater keeps 40 to 50 gallons of water piping hot 24 hours a day, seven days a week--whether or not anyone is home to use it--20 to 50 percent of the energy is completely wasted. Following an aborted crowd-funding campaign in late 2014, Aquanta (formerly Sunnovations) is now taking pre-orders on its Aquanta "learning" water-heater controller, which it expects to ship in July. In a note to its would-be backers when it cancelled its Kickstarter campaign, the team said while its campaign was unsuccessful, the exposure it garnered lead to "a sizable number of large and exciting strategic and distribution partners to contact us." Fast forward 18 months and Aquanta CEO Matthew Carlson tells me his company has "had test units in the field for more than a year."