Mathpix

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Mathpix is the world's first technology that can read pictures of your handwritten math. Simply take a photo, crop your equation of interest, and you instantly get solutions and plots.


Point your phone at an equation and Mathpix will solve it

Engadget

The interface looks like any standard camera app: simply drag the on-screen reticle over the equation and the app solves it and provides graph answers where appropriate. More useful is a step-by-step guide offering multiple methods to reach a solution, making this a bona fide educational tool. It uses image recognition to process problems and pings its servers to do the mathematical heavy lifting, so it likely requires an internet connection to work. Mathpix was envisioned by Stanford PhD student Nico Jimenez, who was advised by Stanford grad Paul Ferrell. The app's other developers are high schoolers Michael Lee and August Trollback, which is impressive for an app that claims to be the first to visually recognize and solve handwritten math problems.


What's the difference between analytics and statistics?

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Statistics and analytics are two branches of data science that share many of their early heroes, so the occasional beer is still dedicated to lively debate about where to draw the boundary between them. Practically, however, modern training programs bearing those names emphasize completely different pursuits. While analysts specialize in exploring what's in your data, statisticians focus more on inferring what's beyond it. Disclaimer: This article is about typical graduates of training programs that teach only statistics or only analytics, and it in no way disparages those who have somehow managed to bulk up both sets of muscles. In fact, elite data scientists are expected to be full experts in analytics and statistics (as well as machine learning)… and miraculously these folks do exist, though they are rare.


What's the difference between analytics and statistics?

#artificialintelligence

Statistics and analytics are two branches of data science that share many of their early heroes, so the occasional beer is still dedicated to a lively debate about where to draw the boundary between them. Practically, however, modern training programs bearing those names emphasize completely different pursuits. While analysts specialize in exploring what's in your data, statisticians focus more on inferring what's beyond it. Disclaimer: This article is about typical graduates of training programs that teach only statistics or only analytics, and it in no way disparages those who have somehow managed to bulk up both sets of muscles. In fact, elite data scientists are expected to be full experts in analytics and statistics (as well as machine learning)… and miraculously these folks do exist, though they are rare.


The advancement of A.I. has the potential to fundamentally change how we solve problems

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"If you control the code, you control the world," security adviser Marc Goodman said in a 2012 a TED Talk. But what happens when humans no longer control the code? This story is based on a radio interview. Listen to the full interview. Today, coding is being disrupted by something called "machine learning."