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Why do we put up with so many bad managers?

BBC News

Would you ever hire an accountant with no bookkeeping training? How about a doctor who hadn't been to medical school? asks author Alison Green, and the creator of the workplace advice column Ask a Manager. We tend to agree that most skilled jobs require some amount of formal training - and yet for one of the jobs that is most key to companies' success, we frequently throw people in with no training at all: managing. Many, many people get promoted into management jobs because they were good at something else. They were a good engineer or a good fundraiser, and so they're asked to manage engineers or fundraisers.


Why Jobs By Gender Harm Both Women And Men

International Business Times

So proclaims Beyoncé in a video in support of the #banbossy campaign. The campaign highlights how when little boys take charge, they're often praised for being a "leader." But when little girls do, they're more likely to be scolded for being too "bossy." And it matters for grownups, too. Research and media stories abound with examples of how gender stereotypes disadvantage women leaders.


Tame your passwords and keep your data safe with Dashlane

Mashable

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Former Braves manager Gonzalez laughs off clumsy firing

U.S. News

FILE - In this April 13, 2016, file photo, Atlanta Braves manager Fredi Gonzalez, right, with general manager John Coppolella sitting at left, talks with the media before a baseball game against the Washington Nationals at Nationals Park, in Washington. The Atlanta Braves have fired manager Fredi Gonzalez, who couldn't survive the worst record in the majors. Braves general manager John Coppolella confirmed the firing of Gonzalez, in his sixth season, Tuesday, May 17, 2016.


Funds run by artificial intelligence

#artificialintelligence

A computer can trounce a human chess master and solve complex mathematical calculations in seconds. Can it do a better job investing your money than a flesh-and-blood portfolio manager? Investors willing to test that question can do so with a couple of exchange-traded funds, or ETFs, that leave the investment decisions to a computer's so-called artificial intelligence, or AI. ETF Managers Group and Ocean Capital Advisors launched an AI-powered fund last month dubbed the Rogers AI Global Macro ETF that invests primarily in single-country ETFs. The fund's AI sifts through millions of data points from countries around the globe and uses what it learns to determine how best to allocate the fund's holdings.