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The GPS 'bullets' that could catch getaway cars: Police expand trials of stick-on trackers officers can fire at suspect vehicles during high-speed chases

Daily Mail - Science & tech

In the United States, police departments are increasingly turning to'GPS bullets' to catch rogue drivers without the risk of a high-speed chase. More than 50 agencies are now using the projectiles, which can be launched from the grill of a police cruiser and stick to a fleeing car to deploy tracking technology. High-speed pursuits often end in a crash, resulting in injuries, property damage, and even death – but, the new tracking method allows officers to follow a suspect's every move without endangering anyone on the road. More than 50 agencies are now using the projectiles, which can be launched from the grille of a police cruiser and stick to the fleeing car to deploy tracking technology. High-speed pursuits often end in a crash, but the new tracking method allows officers to follow a suspect's every move without endangering anyone on the road Police departments are deploying hi-tech GPS'bullets' in order to track rogue drivers without endangering other road users The dual barrel launchers contain two tracking and can be launched with a button on a key fob, carried by the officer.


Swapping streaming remotes for fewer cord-cutting annoyances

PCWorld

It's all too easy to overlook the quality of the remote control when picking a streaming device, as I've written before. You might not realize it from the price tag, for instance, but the $180 Apple TV 4K has one of the worst remotes on the market. The slim design too easily slips between couch cushions, and its trackpad-based controls have a steep learning curve. Conversely, the $29 Roku Express seems like a great value until you realize that its remote lacks basic TV controls. What's a cord-cutter to do, then?


Pronto Peel universal remote control review: Cheap and relatively powerful, but you get what you pay for

PCWorld

The number of mission-specific remote controls we're forced to contend with in our lives grows every time we buy a new piece of A/V equipment. Have a cable box, a TV, a Blu-ray player, and a Hi-Fi? That's four remotes to lose in your couch cushions. Installing device-specific apps on your phone or tablet is no panacea, either. To control this ever-growing tech tsunami, you have three options: You can spend your life searching your home for lost remotes and pray that the ones you find are the ones that you currently need.



Chronos turns your old watch into a smartwatch

Mashable

A challenge smartwatch devices like the Apple Watch face is the love many analog watch fans still have for their traditional timepieces. That challenge just got a bit tougher now that the Chronos, a device designed to turn analog watches into'smart' watches, has started shipping to consumers. The tiny, quarter-sized device attaches to the back of any normal analog watch face and connects via Bluetooth to an app on your smartphone. Once connected, the Chronos offers a small, but useful suite of functions that mirror that of a smartwatch, including activity tracking using its accelerometer, notifications for phone calls, email and messages, as well as control of your music player apps. Most of the device's functions are based on gestures and vibrations.