Artificial Intelligence: What's Human Rights Got To Do With It?

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This is the second blogpost in a series on Artificial Intelligence and Human Rights, co-authored by: Christiaan van Veen (Center for Human Rights and Global Justice at NYU Law) & Corinne Cath (Oxford Internet Institute and Alan Turing Institute). Why are human rights relevant to the debate on Artificial Intelligence (AI)? That question was at the heart of a workshop at Data & Society on April 26 and 27 about'AI and Human Rights,' organized by Dr. Mark Latonero. The timely workshop brought together participants from key tech companies, civil society organizations, academia, government, and international organizations at a time when human rights have been peripheral in discussions on the societal impacts of AI systems. Many of those who are active in the field of AI may have doubts about the'added value' of the human rights framework to their work or are uncertain how addressing the human rights implications of AI is any different from work already being done on'AI and ethics'.


Fish Can Recognize Human Faces, Study Says

U.S. News

Researchers presented the fish with two images of human faces and trained them to spit at one of them (archerfish are known for spitting water to catch flying prey). Once the fish learned to recognize that face, researchers presented them with the learned face and dozens of new faces. The fish reached an average peak success rate of 81 percent in this experiment.


[In Depth] Are labmade human eggs coming soon?

Science

There's no need to start rereading Brave New World just yet. But this week's announcement that biologists in Japan have grown mouse egg cells entirely in a lab dish gave new meaning to the term "test tube babies." The eggs, generated in a dish from two kinds of stem cells, gave rise to pups after being fertilized and implanted into rodent foster mothers. Beyond offering researchers a new way to study egg development, the feat suggests that scientists could someday make human eggs in the lab from almost any type of cell, including genetically altered ones. That may spark hope of new infertility treatments, but will also likely revive fears among those opposed to designer babies.


Online human rights abuse cases hit record in Japan in 2016

The Japan Times

The number of online human rights abuse cases in Japan in 2016 grew 10.0 percent from the previous year to 1,909, hitting a record high for the fourth straight year, the Justice Ministry said Friday. The overall number of human rights violation cases for which actions were taken last year came to 19,443, down 7.4 percent. Of the online abuses, privacy violations such as the disclosure of personal information totaled 1,189 cases. There were 501 cases of defamation. A total of 1,789 cases of the online human rights abuses were resolved, including 326 cases in which the deletion of abusive language and information was requested.


Could Artificial Intelligence Threaten Human Existence?

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Artificial intelligence has always been an interesting subject to discuss especially among fiction writers. Thousands of artificial intelligence applications have been used for years in almost every industry: scientific discovery, medical diagnosis, robot control, stock trading, remote sensing, and even toys. Stephen Hawking says that the development of full artificial intelligence could spell the end of the human race. But, a lot of scientist don't agree with him. They say artificial intelligence could damage society if and only it built or used incorrectly.