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This $3.2 Billion Industry Could Turn Millions of Surveillance Cameras Into an Army of Robot Security Guards

#artificialintelligence

We are surrounded by surveillance cameras that record us at every turn. But for the most part, while those cameras are watching us, no one is watching what those cameras observe or record because no one will pay for the armies of security guards that would be required for such a time-consuming and monotonous task. But imagine that all that video were being watched -- that millions of security guards were monitoring them all 24/7. Imagine this army is made up of guards who don't need to be paid, who never get bored, who never sleep, who never miss a detail, and who have total recall for everything they've seen. Such an army of watchers could scrutinize every person they see for signs of "suspicious" behavior.


Surveillance Society: New High-Tech Cameras Are Watching You

AITopics Original Links

The ferry arrived, the gangway went down and 7-year-old Emma Powell rushed toward the Statue of Liberty. She climbed onto the grass around the star-shaped foundation. She put on a green foam crown with seven protruding rays. Turning so that her body was oriented just like Lady Liberty's, Emma extended her right arm skyward with an imaginary torch. Then I took my niece's hand, and we went off to buy some pretzels.


Cameras are everywhere, and they're changing our lives

AITopics Original Links

Science fiction writer David Brin calls it "a tsunami of lights" -- a future where tiny cameras are everywhere, lighting up everything we do, and even predicting what we'll do next. Unlike George Orwell's novel "1984," where only Big Brother controlled the cameras, in 2015, cheap, mobile technology has turned everyone into a watcher. A snowboarder with a GoPro can post a YouTube video of a friend's 540-degree McTwist in the halfpipe. But also -- as happened recently -- a Penn State fraternity can upload Facebook photos of partially naked, sleeping college women. A San Jose homeowner cowers behind a locked door while she watches an intruder stroll through her home on a surveillance video.


In a cameras-everywhere culture, science fiction becomes reality

AITopics Original Links

Science fiction writer David Brin calls it "a tsunami of lights" -- a future where tiny cameras are everywhere, lighting up everything we do, and even predicting what we'll do next. Unlike George Orwell's novel "1984," where only Big Brother controlled the cameras, in 2015, cheap, mobile technology has turned everyone into a watcher. A snowboarder with a GoPro can post a YouTube video of a friend's 540-degree McTwist in the halfpipe. But also -- as happened recently -- a Penn State fraternity can upload Facebook photos of partially naked, sleeping college women. A San Jose homeowner cowers behind a locked door while she watches an intruder stroll through her home on a surveillance video.


Facial recognition camera projects raise concerns in Eastern Europe

ZDNet

Two years after a mass surveillance system with thousands of facial recognition security cameras was introduced to the streets of Serbian capital Belgrade, concern continues to grow about the impact of the technology. The Huawei-based surveillance system sparked controversy when it was initially introduced in 2019. And now human and digital rights organizations in the country are pushing back and warning about the risks that facial recognition software can bring. During the summer of 2020, the SHARE Foundation, a Belgrade-based digital rights organization that advocates for data privacy and digital security, launched a website called "Thousands of cameras", as a space where Serbian citizens could share their concerns over the mass surveillance project. "The total loss of anonymity represents a certain loss of our freedom – the awareness that we are under constant surveillance drastically changes our decisions," it warns.