DARPA is helping five groups create neural interfaces for our brains

Engadget

DARPA announced on Monday that it has selected its five grant recipients for the Neural Engineering System Design (NESD) program, which it began at the start of this year. Brown University, Columbia University, The Seeing and Hearing Foundation, the John B. Pierce Laboratory, Paradromics Inc and the University of California, Berkeley will all receive multi-million dollar grants to help develop various aspects of the emerging technology. The goal of the NESD program is to develop "an implantable system able to provide precision communication between the brain and the digital world," according to a DARPA release. Also known as "wetware", these brain-computer interfaces would effectively convert the chemical and electrical signals from the brain into machine readable data, and vice versa. Ultimately, the program's operators hope that neural interfaces will be able to communicate with up to 100 million neurons in parallel (though still a far cry from the 86 billion that our brains use in total).


US military reveals funding for 'Matrix' projects

Daily Mail

The US military has revealed $65 of funding for a programme to develop a'brain chip' allowing humans to simply plug into a computer. The goal is'developing an implantable system able to provide precision communication between the brain and the digital world,' DARPA officials said. The goal is'developing an implantable system able to provide precision communication between the brain and the digital world,' DARPA officials said. Four of the teams will focus on vision and two will focus on aspects of hearing and speech. It has selected its five grant recipients for the Neural Engineering System Design (NESD) program, which it began at the start of this year.


US military reveals 'Matrix' projects to plug brains into a computer

#artificialintelligence

The US military has revealed $65 of funding for a programme to develop a'brain chip' allowing humans to simply plug into a computer. The goal is'developing an implantable system able to provide precision communication between the brain and the digital world,' DARPA officials said. It has selected its five grant recipients for the Neural Engineering System Design (NESD) program, which it began at the start of this year. Brown University, Columbia University, The Seeing and Hearing Foundation, the John B. Pierce Laboratory, Paradromics Inc and the University of California, Berkeley will all receive multi-million dollar grants. 'These organizations have formed teams to develop the fundamental research and component technologies required to pursue the NESD vision of a high-resolution neural interface and integrate them to create and demonstrate working systems able to support potential future therapies for sensory restoration,' official said.


U.S. military closer to making cyborgs a reality

#artificialintelligence

The implantable device aims to convert neurons in the brain into electronic signals and provide unprecedented "data-transfer bandwidth between the human brain and the digital world," according to a DARPA statement announcing the new project. DARPA sees the implant as providing a foundation for new therapies that could help people with deficits in sight or hearing by "feeding digital auditory or visual information into the brain." A spokesman for DARPA told CNN that the program is not intended for military applications. But some experts see such an implant as having the potential for numerous applications, including military ones, in the field of wearable robotics -- which aims to augment and restore human performance. Conor Walsh, a professor of mechanical and biomedical engineering at Harvard University, told CNN that the implant would "change the game," adding that "in the future, wearable robotic devices will be controlled by implants."


DARPA to plug computers into brains to let machines talk directly to people

The Independent

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) is developing computers that can be inserted into brains, in order to restore people's senses. It's poured $65 million of funding into the Neural Engineering System Design (NESD) programme, which aims to build an implantable "neural interface". DARPA, which is the research arm of the US military, says the computers will be used to restore impaired or lost senses, including sight, hearing and speech. The I.F.O. is fuelled by eight electric engines, which is able to push the flying object to an estimated top speed of about 120mph. The giant human-like robot bears a striking resemblance to the military robots starring in the movie'Avatar' and is claimed as a world first by its creators from a South Korean robotic company Waseda University's saxophonist robot WAS-5, developed by professor Atsuo Takanishi and Kaptain Rock playing one string light saber guitar perform jam session A man looks at an exhibit entitled'Mimus' a giant industrial robot which has been reprogrammed to interact with humans during a photocall at the new Design Museum in South Kensington, London Electrification Guru Dr. Wolfgang Ziebart talks about the electric Jaguar I-PACE concept SUV before it was unveiled before the Los Angeles Auto Show in Los Angeles, California, U.S The Jaguar I-PACE Concept car is the start of a new era for Jaguar.