Goto

Collaborating Authors

Faculty Search

University of Washington Computer Science

The University of Washington's Paul G. Allen School of Computer Science & Engineering invites applications for up to three tenure-track positions in a wide variety of technical areas in both Computer Science and Computer Engineering. Hires will be made at the Assistant (Tenure-track), Associate (Tenure-eligible), or Full (Tenure-eligible) Professor ranks, commensurate with experience and qualifications. The positions would be full-time, multi-year appointments with 9-month service periods and with an anticipated start date of September 1, 2021. Our school offers a highly collegial and collaborative culture, with broad interdisciplinary research ties across campus. We are leaders both in core computing and computer engineering research, and in research that applies computer science to solve pressing world challenges in medicine and global health, education, accessibility, developing world technology, and others.


Faculty Search

University of Washington Computer Science

The University of Washington's Paul G. Allen School of Computer Science & Engineering invites applications for up to three tenure-track positions in a wide variety of technical areas in both Computer Science and Computer Engineering. Hires will be made at the Assistant (Tenure-track), Associate (Tenure-eligible), or Full (Tenure-eligible) Professor ranks, commensurate with experience and qualifications. The positions would be full-time, multi-year appointments with 9-month service periods and with an anticipated start date of September 1, 2021. Our school offers a highly collegial and collaborative culture, with broad interdisciplinary research ties across campus. We are leaders both in core computing and computer engineering research, and in research that applies computer science to solve pressing world challenges in medicine and global health, education, accessibility, developing world technology, and others.


Lecturer Artificial Intelligence

#artificialintelligence

The Institute for Artificial Intelligence at the University of Georgia invites applications for a full-time Lecturer position starting August 2020. The responsibilities of the position include supporting the needs of our growing undergraduate and graduate student populations by teaching undergraduate courses and combined undergraduate/graduate courses. The position is not tenure-track, but the Lecturer will be a valued member of our faculty and will be encouraged to propose and/or teach a course within the lecturer's area of specialization. Candidates should hold a Ph.D. degree in Artificial Intelligence, Cognitive Science, Computer Science, or a related field. Credentials should reflect a strong commitment to teaching and education.


North Carolina bathroom law could change rules at public colleges

PBS NewsHour

Three university employees are suing the state after North Carolina passed a law requiring public colleges to segregate bathrooms by biological birth gender. Introduced, debated and passed by the North Carolina House and Senate, and signed by the governor in March in under 12 hours. Such was the sudden and speedy birth of North Carolina's Public Facilities Privacy and Security Act, which forces public colleges and universities (as well as other public venues and government buildings) to require their restrooms be used only by people whose biological sex at birth matches the sign on the door. The law, which also prevents local governments from passing individual antidiscrimination laws, was swiftly and forcefully denounced by gay and transgender rights organizations. Several private colleges known for being friendly to lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender students also rejected the spirit of the law -- though it does not directly affect them -- and affirmed they will remain as inclusive as ever, including the choice of individuals to select their own restrooms.


Examining Undergraduate Computer Science Participation in North Carolina

Communications of the ACM

Former U.S. President Obama put forth the initiative'CSForAll' in order to prepare all students to learn computer science (CS) skills and be prepared for the digital economy. The'ForAll' portion of the title emphasizes the importance of inclusion in computing via the participation and creation of tools by and for diverse populations in order to "avoid the consequences of narrowly focused AI (computing and other) applications, including the risk of biases in developing algorithms, by taking advantage of a broader spectrum of experience, backgrounds, and opinions."10 Throughout this report, the Obama administration highlighted the number one priority, and challenge, of the field of CS: to equip the next generation with CS knowledge and skills equitably in preparation for the currency of the digital economy. An increase in government funding is part of the initiative for CSForAll. Of the $4 billion pledged in state funding, only $100 million is sent directly to the K–12 school system.17 The rest of the funding is set aside for research and initiatives involving policymakers to help expand CS opportunities. In just one year, the National Science Foundation (NSF) and Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS) were called to make $135 million in CS funding available.17 The initiative also called for "expanding access to prior NSF supported programs and professional learning communities through their CS10k that led to the creation of more inclusive and accessible CS education curriculum including "Exploring CS and Advanced Placement (AP) CS Principles."