Robots serve humans on land, in sea and air

AITopics Original Links

MIT's version of the "robotoddler" is just the latest MIT entry in the world of robots that can move themselves in a variety of settings. There's still a long way to go before today's robots evolve into practical, everyday technologies, but even now, autonomous robotic vehicles developed at MIT are exploring uncharted or hazardous places, assisting troops in combat and performing household tasks. In addition to his well-known work on humanoid robots such as Kismet, Professor Rodney Brooks led the development of several robotic vehicles and co-founded a company, iRobot, that develops these machines commercially. Troops in Afghanistan use PackBots to explore enemy caves, and soldiers in Iraq use them to detect improvised explosive devices and inspect weapons caches. "In 20 years, we've gone from robots that can hardly maneuver around objects to ones that can navigate in unstructured environments," said Brooks, director of the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL).


Video Friday: SpaceX Rocket Mishaps, Robot Puppy, and Lean Robotics

IEEE Spectrum Robotics

Video Friday is your weekly selection of awesome robotics videos, collected by your Automaton bloggers. We'll also be posting a weekly calendar of upcoming robotics events for the next two months; here's what we have so far (send us your events!): Let us know if you have suggestions for next week, and enjoy today's videos. If you haven't seen this blooper reel of rocket mishaps from SpaceX, it's spectacular: I love this because it's a reminder that robotics (and space robotics especially) is very very hard, and part of the normal process of discovery and learning is trying things and having them go wrong. What should be a normal part of that process is also sharing the failures on video to help the rest of us feel better about our own projects, so especially if you're doing research, make sure and keep a copy of all of those outtakes, and send them to us!


Video Friday: Giant Robotic Chair, Underwater AI, and Robot Holiday Mischief

IEEE Spectrum Robotics

Video Friday is your weekly selection of awesome robotics videos, collected by your Automaton bloggers. We'll also be posting a weekly calendar of upcoming robotics events for the next two months; here's what we have so far (send us your events!):


Video Friday: DARPA's LUKE Arm, Human Support Robot, and Starting a Robotics Company

IEEE Spectrum Robotics

Video Friday is your weekly selection of awesome robotics videos, collected by your Automaton bloggers. We'll also be posting a weekly calendar of upcoming robotics events for the next two months; here's what we have so far (send us your events!): Let us know if you have suggestions for next week, and enjoy today's videos. Dean Kamen's DEKA R&D firm, with support from DARPA's Revolutionizing Prosthetics Program, designed the advanced prosthetic LUKE Arm to give amputees "dexterous arm and hand movement through a simple, intuitive control system." The LUKE Arm, which stands for Life Under Kinetic Evolution but is also a reference to Luke Skywalker's bionic hand, "allows users to control multiple joints simultaneously and provides a variety of grips and grip forces by means of wireless signals generated by sensors worn on the feet or via other easy-to-use controllers."


Video Friday: Rescue Robot, Gesture Control, and 1986 Self-Driving Van

IEEE Spectrum Robotics

Video Friday is your weekly selection of awesome robotics videos, collected by your Automaton bloggers. We'll also be posting a weekly calendar of upcoming robotics events for the next two months; here's what we have so far (send us your events!): Let us know if you have suggestions for next week, and enjoy today's videos. The 2016 U.S. Robotics Roadmap was released this week; it's a massive document authored by 150 roboticists that's intended to help frame and guide research and policy decisions with the goal of solving societal problems in the United States. We'll be taking a closer look at it, but here's a 30-minute summary from lead editor Henrik Christensen: The legged robot ANYmal can support disaster relief teams with safer search and rescue operations.