How to Get the Best Results from Big Data Analysis - Knowledge@Wharton

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Scott E. Page, professor of complex systems, political science and economics at the University of Michigan, doesn't want people to limit themselves to linear thinking. In his new book, The Model Thinker: What You Need to Know to Make Data Work for You, he explains how taking a multi-paradigm approach puts more power into solving problems, innovating and understanding the full range of consequences to complex actions. He believes using many models is the best way to make sense out of the reams of data available in today's digital world. Page recently spoke on the Knowledge@Wharton radio show on Sirius XM about why it's important to widen your data lens. An edited transcript of the conversation follows. Knowledge@Wharton: What is multi-model thinking? Scott Page: We live in this time where there are two fundamental things going on. One is, there's just a firehose or hairball of data, right?


Diabetes Data Platform Leader Glooko Raises $35 Million in Series C

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WIRE)--Glooko, the leader in diabetes data management, today announced $35 million in new funding to accelerate growth, expand international presence, and deepen expertise in data analytics. This round was led by Georgian Partners, a Toronto-based investor focused on applied analytics and machine learning. Other new investors include Insulet Corporation and Mayo Clinic who join existing investors Canaan Partners, Social Capital, Medtronic and Samsung NEXT in the round. Glooko will use the funds to accelerate growth by expanding its sales, marketing and development teams. The company will also increase commercialization efforts in France, Germany, the U.K., Asia and the Middle East, and further development efforts in data analytics and artificial intelligence to provide personalized insights that drive meaningful behavior change.


Web service makes big data available to neuroscientists

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Randal Burns recalls that the brain-science community was "abuzz" in 2011. Burns, a computer scientist at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland, was focusing on astrophysics and fluid dynamics data management at the time. But he was intrigued when Joshua Vogelstein, a neuroscientist and colleague at Johns Hopkins, told him that the first large-scale neural-connectivity data sets had just been collected and asked for his help to present them online. "It was the first time that you had data of that quality, at that resolution and scale, where you had the sense that you could build a neural map of an interesting portion of the brain," says Burns. Vogelstein worked with Burns to build a system that would make those data -- 20 trillion voxels' worth -- available to the larger neuroscience community. The team has now generalized the software to support different classes of imaging data and describes the system this week (J.


Will Artificial Intelligence be a Trump Card for MedTech?

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In the era of big data, unless one's portfolio is in tune with the evolving digital trend, making prudent investment choices can prove to be a daunting task. Millennials have started to recognize the increasing need of the emerging automation trend and subsequently robotics, IoT, 3D printing are becoming part of our daily life with the latest buzzword being Artificial Intelligence (AI). While Siri and Ok Google have made life easier, the latest version of Global Positioning System helps track almost anything and everything along with its intelligent route map. Also, not being a pro on social network sites like Facebook, Twitter or snapchat can be seen as primitive. According to investment giant Jim Cramer, AI along with big data will soon let companies to bat a thousand.


Big data and AI will probably keep you alive longer

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A good number of health care stats fall into the shocking category. For example, each year 270,000-plus women in the U.S. are diagnosed with breast cancer -- more than 45,000 die from the debilitating illness annually. Some 85% of breast cancers occur with no family history of it, making preventing its occurrence through diet and positive lifestyle habits impossible. Meanwhile, the U.S. obesity rate is at a historic high -- about 100 million people in the U.S. are considered obese. Alarmingly, 26% of 2 to 5 year olds are viewed as overweight, according to a recent Duke University study.