Top cloud providers 2019: AWS, Microsoft Azure, Google Cloud; IBM makes hybrid move; Salesforce dominates SaaS

ZDNet

Cloud computing is insatiably gobbling up more of the backend services that power businesses. But, some companies have apps with privacy, security, and regulatory demands that preclude the cloud. Here's how to find the right mix of public cloud and private cloud. The top cloud providers for 2019 have maintained their positions, but the themes, strategies, and approaches to the market are all in flux. The infrastructure-as-a-service wars have been largely decided, with the spoils going to Amazon Web Services, Microsoft Azure, and Google Cloud Platform, but new technologies such as artificial intelligence and machine learning have opened the field up to other players. Meanwhile, the cloud computing market in 2019 will have a decidedly multi-cloud spin, as the hybrid shift by players such as IBM, which is acquiring Red Hat, could change the landscape. This year's edition of the top cloud computing providers also features software-as-a-service giants that will increasingly run more of your enterprise's operations via expansion. One thing to note about the cloud in 2019 is that the market isn't zero sum. Cloud computing is driving IT spending overall. For instance, Gartner predicts that 2019 global IT spending will increase 3.2 percent to $3.76 trillion with as-a-service models fueling everything from data center spending to enterprise software.


Cloud warriors led by Amazon, Microsoft battle for 300B in spoils

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

Visitors arrive at the cloud pavilion of Amazon Web Services at the 2016 CeBIT digital technology trade fair on March 14, 2016. SAN FRANCISCO -- The cloud wars are beginning to thunder. Once largely a solution for start-ups that couldn't afford to build out and maintain computing infrastructure, the cloud is fast becoming a cost-effective way for large corporations to manage their digital lifeblood. A survey from research firm IDC last month found that 58% of companies planned to use web-based cloud services, up from 24% in last 2014. The stakes are high: As more companies realize the benefits of shifting software and data off their own computers, tech heavyweights and their smaller cloud-focused competitors are battling more aggressively for these clients.


Cloud warriors battle for 2019's 300B spoils

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

Amazon founder Jeff Bezos, shown here standing next to a nozzle for one of his space company's rockets, made a big bet on the cloud a decade ago. Amazon's AWS is the cloud market leader. SAN FRANCISCO -- The cloud wars are beginning to thunder. Once largely a solution for start-ups that couldn't afford to build out and maintain computing infrastructure, the cloud is fast becoming a cost-effective way for large corporations to manage their digital lifeblood. A survey from research firm IDC last month found that 58% of companies planned to use web-based cloud services, up from 24% in last 2014.


IaaS in 2016: Who can challenge Amazon?

ZDNet

Infrastructure as a service (IaaS) is a maturing segment of the cloud computing market. In its 2015 Cloud Computing Hype Cycle, Gartner placed IaaS on the'Slope of Enlightenment', which is the last stage before mainstream adoption (a.k.a the Plateau of Productivity). Also approaching the SoE is'IaaS ', which provides additional services on top of basic compute, storage, and networking (such as database services and content delivery networks) but falls short of those offered by full-blown PaaS (Platform as a Service) providers. Meanwhile, 'Private IaaS' (single-tenant cloud infrastructure, hosted by a provider or on the client's premises) currently languishes in the Trough of Disillusionment. The dominant IaaS player in the public cloud is Amazon Web Services (AWS), which launched in 2006 with EC2 (compute) and S3 (storage) services.


Flexera acquires RightScale to combine software asset, cloud management

ZDNet

Flexera, a software asset management company, is acquiring cloud management firm RightScale in a deal that melds enterprise applications and cloud deployments. For privately-held Flexera, RightScale gives it a core cloud play and a management platform to sell to its customer base. RightScale hatched its cloud management platform in 2007 and later launched Optima to manage cloud costs. Optima is bundled with the broader RightScale cloud management suite and sold standalone. According to the companies, the two technology stacks are complementary and should be able to optimize software and cloud spending across an organization.