The Future of AI Depends on High-School Girls

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During her freshman year, Stephanie Tena, a 16-year-old programmer, was searching the internet for coding programs and came across a website for an organization called AI4All, which runs an artificial-intelligence summer camp for high-schoolers. On the site, a group of girls her age were gathered around an autonomous car in front of the iconic arches of Stanford's campus. "AI will change the world," the text read. Tena thought maybe she could. She lives in a trailer park in California's Salinas Valley; her mom, a Mexican immigrant from Michoacán, picks strawberries in the nearby fields.*


The Thinking Machine: Paola Sturla calls on designers to renew their commitment to humanism - Harvard Graduate School of Design

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Smart cities, search engines, autonomous vehicles: The pairing of massive data sets and self-learning algorithms is transforming the world around us in ways that are not always easy to grasp. The strange ways computers "think" are hidden within opaque proprietary code. It has been called the "end of theory." There is a danger, says Paola Sturla, Lecturer in Landscape Architecture at the Harvard Graduate School of Design, that human agency will be nudged out of the picture. Sturla, who is trained as an architect and landscape architect, has called on designers to renew the tradition of humanism.


The quest for artificial intelligence that can outsmart hackers

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In the future, will artificial intelligence be so sophisticated that it will be able to tell when someone is trying to deceive it? A Carnegie Mellon University professor and his team is working on technology that could move this idea from the realm of science fiction to reality. Their work -- rooted in game theory and machine learning -- is part of a larger push for more advanced AI. As AI becomes more commonplace in the technology we use every day, detractors and supporters are becoming more vocal about its potential risks and benefits. For some, smarter AI sets up a dangerous precedent for a future too reliant on machines to make decisions about everything from medical diagnoses to the operation of self-driving cars.


The quest for artificial intelligence that can outsmart hackers

#artificialintelligence

In the future, will artificial intelligence be so sophisticated that it will be able to tell when someone is trying to deceive it? A Carnegie Mellon University professor and his team is working on technology that could move this idea from the realm of science fiction to reality. Their work -- rooted in game theory and machine learning -- is part of a larger push for more advanced AI. As AI becomes more commonplace in the technology we use every day, detractors and supporters are becoming more vocal about its potential risks and benefits. For some, smarter AI sets up a dangerous precedent for a future too reliant on machines to make decisions about everything from medical diagnoses to the operation of self-driving cars.


How UC Berkeley's New Center Could Prevent a Military A.I. Apocalypse

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Here's How Google Will Use A.I. to Help Fight Cancer Could killer AI robots bring down America? How UC Berkeley's New Center Could Prevent a Military A.I. Apocalypse Beauty.AI App the 1st international beauty contest judged by AI A treasure hunter went missing in the Rocky Mountains, and a computer algorithm found him ... Drive.ai wants to give self-driving cars more brainpower, personality