FAA Expects 600,000 Commercial Drones In The Air Within A Year

NPR Technology

Drones are flown at a training class in Las Vegas in anticipation of new regulations allowing their commercial use. Drones are flown at a training class in Las Vegas in anticipation of new regulations allowing their commercial use. We are in "one of the most dramatic periods of change in the history of transportation," says Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx. He was talking about all of it: the self-driving cars, the smart-city movement, the maritime innovations. The Federal Aviation Administration expects some 600,000 drones to be used commercially within a year.


A burger from the sky? Uber's hoping to deliver food by drone in 2021, report

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

A new report says Uber plans to roll out a fleet of food-delivery drones by 2021. A drone flies over a city. Uber's flight ambitions expand beyond just shuttling people. It also includes delivering food. According to a job posting spotted by The Wall Street Journal, Uber is looking to hire an executive to help launch its drone food delivery program known internally as UberExpress.


Uber claims its food delivery drone service will be up and running in 'multiple markets' by 2021

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Uber's dream of delivering food via drones may no longer be just pie in the sky. The ride-hailing giant is eyeing the launch of its drone delivery service in multiple markets as soon as 2021, the Wall Street Journal reported. This plan is described in a since-deleted job listing on Uber's website, where it appears to be looking for a drone executive to'enable safe, legal, efficient and scalable flight operations.' Uber's dream of delivering food via drones may no longer be just pie in the sky. The drone executive would be tasked with making Uber's delivery drones functional by 2019 and, ultimately, commercially operational by 2021.



Almost human? Google's developing robots

AITopics Original Links

First it was Amazon drones; now Google is rolling out robots. The tech company revealed it is developing humanoid robots focused on automating daily tasks, according to The New York Times Wednesday, right on the heels of Amazon announcing the development of a drone delivery program, PrimeAir. Though Google remained tight-lipped on where the project stands, and what specific tasks its robots might do, the announcement has spurred conversation on what role artificial intelligence and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) may play in our future. The project is spearheaded by Google executive Andy Rubin; better known as the engineer who built Google's Android software. He sees the robots as a way to alleviate daily grunt work, possibly in a consumer goods delivery setting.