Francis Crick: Difference between revisions - Wikipedia

#artificialintelligence

Francis Harry Compton Crick OM FRS[1][4] (8 June 1916 – 28 July 2004) was a British molecular biologist, biophysicist, and neuroscientist, most noted for being a co-discoverer of the structure of the DNA molecule in 1953 with James Watson, work which was based partly on fundamental studies done by Rosalind Franklin, Raymond Gosling and Maurice Wilkins. Together with Watson and Maurice Wilkins, he was jointly awarded the 1962 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine "for their discoveries concerning the molecular structure of nucleic acids and its significance for information transfer in living material".[3][6] Crick was an important theoretical molecular biologist and played a crucial role in research related to revealing the helical structure of DNA. He is widely known for use of the term "central dogma" to summarize the idea that genetic information flow in cells is essentially one-way, from DNA to RNA to protein.[7] During the remainder of his career, he held the post of J.W. Kieckhefer Distinguished Research Professor at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in La Jolla, California. His later research centered on theoretical neurobiology and attempts to advance the scientific study of human consciousness. He remained in this post until his death; "he was editing a manuscript on his death bed, a scientist until the bitter end" according to Christof Koch.[8] Crick was the first son of Harry Crick (1887–1948) and Annie Elizabeth Crick (née Wilkins; 1879–1955). He was born and raised in Weston Favell, then a small village near the English town of Northampton, in which Crick's father and uncle ran the family's boot and shoe factory. His grandfather, Walter Drawbridge Crick (1857–1903), an amateur naturalist, wrote a survey of local foraminifera (single-celled protists with shells), corresponded with Charles Darwin,[9] and had two gastropods (snails or slugs) named after him. At an early age, Francis was attracted to science and what he could learn about it from books. As a child, he was taken to church by his parents. But by about age 12, he said he did not want to go anymore, as he preferred a scientific search for answers over religious belief.[10] Walter Crick, his uncle, lived in a small house on the south side of Abington Avenue; he had a shed at the bottom of his little garden where he taught Crick to blow glass, do chemical experiments and to make photographic prints. When he was eight or nine he transferred to the most junior form of the Northampton Grammar School, on the Billing Road.


They Should Know How We Feel! Using AI to Measure Our Psychology (with Daniel McDuff)

#artificialintelligence

During my last interview I had a great talk with Daniel McDuff. Daniel's research is at the intersection of psychology and computer science. He is interested in designing hardware and algorithms for sensing human behavior at scale, and in building technologies that make life better. Applications of behavior sensing that he is most excited about are in: understanding mental health, improving online learning and designing new connected devices (IoT). Listen to more about why it is important to collect data from much larger scales and help computers read our emotional state. Key Learning Points: 1. Understanding the impact, intersection, and meaning of Psychology and Computer Science 2. Facial Expression Recognition 3. How to define Artificial Intelligence, Deep Learning, and Machine Learning 4. Applications of behavior sensing with Online Learning, Health, and Connected Devices 5. Visual Wearable sensors and heart health 6. The impact of education and learning 7. How to build computers to measure phycology, our reactions, emotions, etc 8. Daniel is building and utilizing scalable computer vision and machine learning tools to enable the automated recognition and analysis of emotions and physiology. He is currently Director of Research at Affectiva, a post-doctoral research affiliate at the MIT Media Lab and a visiting scientist at Brigham and Womens Hospital. At Affectiva Daniel is building state-of-the-art facial expression recognition software and leading analysis of the world's largest database of human emotion responses. Daniel completed his PhD in the Affective Computing Group at the MIT Media Lab in 2014 and has a B.A. and Masters from Cambridge University. His work has received nominations and awards from Popular Science magazine as one of the top inventions in 2011, South-by-South-West Interactive (SXSWi), The Webby Awards, ESOMAR, the Center for Integrated Medicine and Innovative Technology (CIMIT) and several IEEE conferences. His work has been reported in many publications including The Times, the New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, BBC News, New Scientist and Forbes magazine. Daniel has been named a 2015 WIRED Innovation Fellow.


The extraordinary life in pictures of Stephen Hawking

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Stephen Hawking was one of the world's most acclaimed cosmologists, a medical miracle, and probably the galaxy's most unlikely superstar celebrity. After being diagnosed with a rare form of motor neurone disease in 1964 at the age of 22, he was given just a few years to live. He died today his home in Cambridge, aged, 76, and tributes have flooded in from all over the world. Here, MailOnline looks at his life in pictures.... Stephen Hawking (left) pictured as a young boy, with his baby sister Mary. As an undergraduate at Oxford (pictured on his graduation day in 1962), the young Hawking was so good at physics that he got through with little effort.


Lord Snowdon, ex-husband of Princess Margaret, dies at 86

U.S. News

Lord Snowden, the former husband of Princess Margaret who was also a photographer, has died. Antony Armstrong-Jones, or Lord Snowdon, died peacefully at his home on Friday. Photo agency Camera Press confirmed his death. Buckingham Palace also said that Queen Elizabeth II, Margaret's sister, had been told that he died. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


Police name Texas church shooting victims, from the pastor's daughter to a pregnant mother

FOX News

A shooter opens fire inside a small town Texas church leaving at least 26 people dead. Here's what we know about the victims and the heroic attempt to stop the gunman. At least 26 churchgoers were killed when a gunman opened fire inside First Baptist Church in Texas during Sunday's service. Wilson County Sheriff Joe D. Tackitt Jr. said once the shooting began inside the Sutherland Springs, Texas, church, there was likely "no way" for congregants to escape. The youngest victims were an 18-month-old and unborn child, according to a list of the victims released by the Texas Department of Public Safety. Vice President Mike Pence will travel to Texas Wednesday to attend a prayer service for the victims of the shooting and visit with those recovering in the hospital. Annabelle Pomeroy was the pastor of First Baptist Church's 14-year-old daughter. Pastor Frank Pomeroy and his wife were out of town Sunday during the attack – but their youngest daughter, Annabelle, attended the service. The 14-year-old was among those killed, according to relatives. "We lost more than Belle yesterday. One thing that gives me a sliver of encouragement is that Belle was surrounded yesterday by her church family that she loved fiercely and vice versa," Sherri Pomeroy, her mother, said Monday.