Turnbull opens UNSW quantum computing lab in Sydney

ZDNet

The University of New South Wales (UNSW) officially opened its new Centre for Quantum Computation and Communications Technology (CQC2T), as teams of engineers prepare to secure their spot as the global pioneers of quantum computing. Officially opening the CQC2T at the university's Sydney campus, Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull declared that there was no bolder idea than quantum computing, saying it is a technology that revolutionises computing. A quantum computer with a processing power hitherto unimagined, and certainly not realised," he said. "This lab is up to 10 years ahead of any other in the world." Impressed with the work CQC2T director Professor Michelle Simmons has achieved with her team thus far, Turnbull said UNSW's engineers are doing the best work in the world in this field.


UTS opens centre for quantum software development

ZDNet

The University of Technology Sydney (UTS) has launched its new Centre for Quantum Software and Information (CQSI). Speaking at the launch on Monday, UTS Deputy vice chancellor of Research Glenn Wightwick said the new centre will be solely dedicated to the development of the software and information processing infrastructure required to run applications at quantum scale. "It's clear that we're on the cusp of a new era of computing," Wightwick said. "We're incredibly excited about the potential of quantum computing to solve problems that the fastest classical computers will never be able to solve. "It's these forces that are driving this period of sustained innovation in the field of quantum computing.


UNSW obtains 10-fold boost in quantum computing stability

ZDNet

Engineers at the University of New South Wales (UNSW) have created a new quantum bit (qubit) which remains in a stable superposition for 10 times longer than previously achieved, expanding the time during which calculations could be performed in a future silicon quantum computer. According to Arne Laucht, a Research Fellow at the School of Electrical Engineering & Telecommunications at UNSW, the new qubit, made up of the spin of a single atom in silicon and merged with an electromagnetic field -- known as a dressed qubit -- retains quantum information for much longer that an "undressed" atom, which opens up new avenues quantum computer creation. The Australian-based team said the race to building a quantum computer has been called the "space race of the 21st century" as it is both a difficult and ambitious challenge to undertake. The appeal, however, is the potential to deliver revolutionary tools for tackling otherwise impossible calculations, such as the design of complex drugs and advanced materials, or the rapid search of large-scale, unsorted databases. Explaining the importance of the breakthrough, Andrea Morello, leader of the research team and a Program Manager in the Centre for Quantum Computation & Communication Technology (CQC2T) at UNSW, said its speed and power lies in the fact that quantum systems can host multiple "superpositions" of different initial states, treated as inputs in a computer that all get processed at the same time.


University of Sydney develops quantum trick to block background sensor 'chatter'

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A team from the University of Sydney (USyd), alongside Dartmouth College and Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory in the US, has announced solving a common problem in quantum sensing devices, effectively developing a method to block background "chatter". According to the university, the quantum control techniques enable new ultra-sensitive sensors that can identify tiny signals while rejecting background noise down to theoretical limits. Led by professor Michael J Biercuk, who is also the chief investigator at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Engineered Quantum Systems, the team has managed to "trick" devices that are too sensitive to block out background noise. "By applying the right quantum controls to a qubit [quantum bit]-based sensor, we can adjust its response in a way that guarantees the best possible exclusion of the background clutter -- that is, the other voices in the room," professor Biercuk explained. USyd said that while devices themselves have improved, the measurement protocols used to capture and interpret the signals have lagged behind and quantum sensors therefore often return "fuzzy" results, complicating the interpretation of the data through a phenomenon known as "spectral leakage".


Flip-flop qubits: UNSW conceives 'radical' quantum computing design

ZDNet

Engineers at the University of New South Wales (UNSW) have announced the invention of a "radical" architecture for quantum computing, essentially allowing quantum bits (qubits) -- the basic unit of information in a quantum computer -- to be placed hundreds of nanometres apart and still remain coupled. The invention is based on novel "flip-flop qubits" that UNSW said promises to make the large-scale manufacture of quantum chips dramatically cheaper and easier. To operate the flip-flop qubit, researchers need to pull the electron away from the nucleus, using the electrodes at the top; doing so creates an electric dipole. The conceptual breakthrough is the creation of an entirely new type of qubit using both the nucleus and the electron. The new chip design allows for a silicon quantum processor that can be scaled up without the precise placement of atoms required in other approaches.