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The rise of no-code and low-code software (free PDF)

ZDNet

Businesses can thank no-code and low-code software for changing how enterprise applications are created and who creates them. Just how popular are these software development platforms? ZDNet and TechRepublic journalists find out in this special feature, which investigates the impact of no-code and low-code software on the enterprise and helps IT leaders understand the consequences of non-developers becoming app builders and how to successfully take advantage of this trend. This ebook, based on the latest ZDNet / TechRepublic special feature, helps IT leaders understand the consequences of non-developers becoming app builders and how to successfully take advantage of this trend. ZDNet's Joe McKendrick's primer on low-code and no-code solutions, 'What is low-code and no-code?


Low-code and no-code development is changing how software is built - and who builds it

ZDNet

Spring has always been a busy time for plant nurseries. This year, "busy" has been an understatement: amid a months-long lockdown, there has been unprecedented enthusiasm for more greenery. For US-based nursery Classic GroundCovers, the sudden deluge of orders that the COVID-19 crisis brought about certainly kept the business busy – but also came with unforeseen consequences. The sheer volume of requests overwhelmed the company's small-scale, manual order processing system. But in only one month, despite limited technical knowledge and the little time available to brainstorm ideas, Classic GroundCovers' team found itself using a brand-new app that automates the entire process, integrating orders from the company's e-commerce website with in-house business applications.


Survey: Low-code and no-code platform usage increases

ZDNet

Low-code and no-code (LCNC) platforms offer the promise of solving business problems and expediting digital transformation initiatives. And organizations both large and small can't seem to get enough of them. This ebook, based on the latest ZDNet / TechRepublic special feature, helps IT leaders understand the consequences of non-developers becoming app builders and how to successfully take advantage of this trend. TechRepublic Premium surveyed 414 respondents across a range of disciplines, company sizes, industry verticals, and job functions to find out how their organizations are using LCNC platforms, or why they are not using them, and what they think this all means for the future availability of developer jobs. Nearly half (47%) of those surveyed currently use LCNC in their organizations.


Office Excel: Why it's Microsoft's not-so-secret weapon in no-code app development

ZDNet

Low-code, no-code or visual-based coding is getting more attention these days. Amazon Web Services (AWS) in June launched a beta of Honeycode. Google in January snapped up low-code outfit AppSheet and killed off AppMaker for Workspace, formerly G Suite, also beefing up Google Cloud with the Business Application Platform in September. Salesforce has its Lightning platform, while Oracle has Application Express (APEX), and there are more offerings from Appian, Zoho, ServiceNow and others vying for a slice of businesses' undergoing digital transformation. The promise of low- and no-code platforms is that business users can create mobile and web apps by pulling data from spreadsheets or databases to help their colleagues access data where and when they need it – in a browser or a mobile device – almost without requiring professional developers.


How low-code development is supporting this growing business, from beehives to bottles of gin

ZDNet

With the help of low-code solutions, the British Honey Company has made a name for itself by producing a range of honey products and spirits. When Michael Williams bought a few beehives as a retirement hobby, little did he expect that his casual new project would eventually turn out to become a fully-fledged business selling millions-worth of honey-based goods. But what is now known as the British Honey Company (BHC) has made a name for itself for producing 13 different honey products and 16 types of spirits, and is currently processing an average 1.5 million bottles of honey-infused gin, vodka, rum and whisky a year. To track everything from beehives to bottles the company is using software built on low-code platform Filemaker, now re-branded Claris. Williams was first keen to use Claris to help secure a food standard certification called the Safe and Local Supplier Approval (SAFE), which requires tracing and testing the product from the beehive to the jar, to guarantee a certain level of quality.