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Yemen peace talks begin in Kuwait after Shiite rebels arrive

U.S. News

KUWAIT CITY (AP) -- U.N.-backed peace talks between Yemen's warring sides began in Kuwait on Thursday evening in an effort to end the impoverished country's year-long conflict that has killed nearly 9,000 people -- a third of them civilians, according to the United Nations. The talks were originally slated to begin Monday but were delayed because of an earlier boycott by the Yemeni Shiite rebels known as Houthis and their allies. There have been previous attempts at peace talks. This round in Kuwait is aimed at finding ways to resolve the conflict between Yemen's internationally recognized government, which is backed by a Saudi-led military coalition, and the Houthis and their allies, which include forces loyal to former longtime Yemeni President Ali Abdullah Saleh. Just a day before the talks kicked off, the Houthis warned they could suspend their participation if there are continued violations of a cease-fire in place since April 10.


Sporadic fighting mars first day of cease-fire in Yemen

FOX News

SANAA, Yemen – A U.N.-brokered cease-fire was mostly holding across war-torn Yemen on Monday except in the besieged city of Taiz where shelling killed at least one person and wounded five, according to residents. There were also sporadic exchanges of gunfire in other parts of the country after the truce between the Saudi-led coalition, which backs Yemen's internationally recognized government, and the Shiite rebels known as Houthis went into effect at midnight Sunday. In the capital, Sanaa, which has been under the Houthis' control since September 2014, the coalition largely halted its airstrikes. But in the district of Naham, on the fringes of Sanaa province, fighting continued overnight between armed men backing the government and the Houthis, according to residents there. The residents in both in Taiz and in Naham spoke on condition of anonymity, fearing for their safety.


Sporadic fighting mars first day of cease-fire in Yemen

Associated Press

A U.N.-brokered cease-fire was mostly holding across war-torn Yemen on Monday except in the besieged city of Taiz where shelling killed at least one person and wounded five, according to residents. There were also sporadic exchanges of gunfire in other parts of the country after the truce between the Saudi-led coalition, which backs Yemen's internationally recognized government, and the Shiite rebels known as Houthis went into effect at midnight Sunday. Residents of Taiz, which has been besieged by the rebels for over a year, are blaming the Houthis for the overnight random shelling that killed one civilian and wounded four. But in the district of Naham, on the fringes of Sanaa province, fighting continued overnight between armed men backing the government and the Houthis, according to residents there.


Yemen's rebels reverse course, decide to attend peace talks

U.S. News

A senior leader of Yemen's Shiite Houthi rebels has said the Iranian-backed movement has reversed course and would participate in U.N.-sponsored talks designed to end the war in the impoverished Arab nation. Houthi representations would leave for Kuwait, the talks' venue, later Wednesday, he said. In a statement issued late Tuesday, senior Houthi leader Mahdi al-Mashat said the movement has received assurances from Kuwait and neighboring Oman that there will be an end to violations of a weeklong cease-fire in Yemen by airstrikes launched by a Saudi-led coalition. "We reserve the right to suspend our participation if the promises are not kept," said al-Mashat, who will head the Houth delegation. "The forces of aggression then will have to assume full responsibility for the consequences of their failure to honor their commitments."


Saudi-led coalition says it will adhere to Yemen cease-fire

U.S. News

The Saudi-led coalition that has been bombing Yemen's Houthi rebels for more than a year said it will adhere to a cease-fire that took effect just before midnight Sunday, and the rebels also pledged to halt hostilities. The coalition said in a statement carried by the official Saudi Press Agency that it retains the right to respond to any violations of the cease-fire, but that it intends to halt all airstrikes and hostilities in preparation for U.N.-sponsored peace talks scheduled to take place in Kuwait on April 18. The Houthis later issued their own statement in which they promised to abide by the cease-fire while reserving the right to respond to any potential violations. There have been previous rounds of cease-fires between the warring sides. This latest attempt, announced by the U.N. envoy to Yemen last month, is scheduled to begin at 11:59 p.m. (2059 GMT) Sunday.