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A 20-Year Community Roadmap for Artificial Intelligence Research in the US

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Decades of research in artificial intelligence (AI) have produced formidable technologies that are providing immense benefit to industry, government, and society. AI systems can now translate across multiple languages, identify objects in images and video, streamline manufacturing processes, and control cars. The deployment of AI systems has not only created a trillion-dollar industry that is projected to quadruple in three years, but has also exposed the need to make AI systems fair, explainable, trustworthy, and secure. Future AI systems will rightfully be expected to reason effectively about the world in which they (and people) operate, handling complex tasks and responsibilities effectively and ethically, engaging in meaningful communication, and improving their awareness through experience. Achieving the full potential of AI technologies poses research challenges that require a radical transformation of the AI research enterprise, facilitated by significant and sustained investment. These are the major recommendations of a recent community effort coordinated by the Computing Community Consortium and the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence to formulate a Roadmap for AI research and development over the next two decades.


Development of Secure Embedded Systems Coursera

@machinelearnbot

Three people died after the crash landing of an Asiana Airlines aircraft from Seoul, Korea, at San Fransisco International Airport (SFO) on July 6, 2013. The American National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) established that the crash most probably was caused by the flight crew's (in)actions. Three teenage girls lost their lives; two in the airplane and another was accidentally run over by a firetruck. The human factor is often cause for accidents. NTSB and others report that more than 50 percent of plane crashes is caused by pilot error (and for road accidents it is even 90 perc.)




GritNet 2: Real-Time Student Performance Prediction with Domain Adaptation

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Increasingly fast development and update cycle of online course contents, and diverse demographics of students in each online classroom, make student performance prediction in real-time (before the course finishes) an interesting topic for both industrial research and practical needs. In that, we tackle the problem of real-time student performance prediction with on-going courses in domain adaptation framework, which is a system trained on students' labeled outcome from one previous coursework but is meant to be deployed on another. In particular, we first review recently-developed GritNet architecture which is the current state of the art for student performance prediction problem, and introduce a new unsupervised domain adaptation method to transfer a GritNet trained on a past course to a new course without any (students' outcome) label. Our results for real Udacity students' graduation predictions show that the GritNet not only generalizes well from one course to another across different Nanodegree programs, but enhances real-time predictions explicitly in the first few weeks when accurate predictions are most challenging.