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Terminator Takes a Step Closer to Reality

#artificialintelligence

The truth is often stranger than fiction is a well-known adage. Whether this is true for science fiction or not is a subject for debate. Science does however tend to move steadily towards a reality that was originally portrayed as science fiction. Solid-state components with semiconducting devices and fixed metallic tracks are used for modern electronic technologies like computers and smart phones. Being able to create truly elastic electronic components is a dream that is slowly but surely being realized.


Terminator-style liquid metal morphs into physical shapes

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

UK-based researchers have applied electrical charges to manipulate liquid metal into 2D shapes, bringing to mind the terrifying T-1000 character in the Terminator film franchise, which comes to life from a pool of similar material. Jim Drury reports Video provided by Reuters Newslook


A liquid metal reaction environment for the room-temperature synthesis of atomically thin metal oxides

Science

Two-dimensional (2D) oxides have a wide variety of applications in electronics and other technologies. However, many oxides are not easy to synthesize as 2D materials through conventional methods. We used nontoxic eutectic gallium-based alloys as a reaction solvent and co-alloyed desired metals into the melt. On the basis of thermodynamic considerations, we predicted the composition of the self-limiting interfacial oxide. We isolated the surface oxide as a 2D layer, either on substrates or in suspension.


Scientists develop Terminator-style stretchable liquid metal

Daily Mail - Science & tech

A new host of liquid metals that have applications towards soft robotics are making movies like'The Terminator' transcend make-believe. According to researchers, experimental liquid metals like gallium and other alloys, when supplemented with nickel or iron, are able to flex and mold into shapes with the use of magnets, much like the iconic movie villain, T-1000 from'The Terminator 2: Judgement Day.' While other such metals have been developed, they contended with two major drawbacks. A new host of liquid metals that have applications towards soft robotics are making movies like'The Terminator' transcend make-believe toward real life. Researchers say experimental liquid metals like gallium and other alloys, when supplemented with nickel or iron, are able to flex and mold into shapes with the use of magnets. A new material revealed by the American Chemical Society solves to major problems experienced by similar substances.


Alien autopsy: Meet the radical 'Element 31' cooling inside Alienware's new X-series gaming laptops

PCWorld

Cooling is half the battle in gaming laptops and Alienware's new secret weapon is its mysterious "Element 31," which the company finally revealed at Computex 2021. Element 31--named for gallium's 31st place on the periodic table--is essentially an encapsulated gallium liquid metal and one of the exotic materials Alienware used to make the stupidly thin Alienware x15 and x17 laptops. Traditional liquid metals have been used by enthusiasts on desktops for some time, as well as high-end laptops for the last couple of years or so, but it's always had downsides. Alienware actually looked at phase-change materials, aluminum-doped materials, organic waxes, graphite and raw liquid metals, but decided Element 31 was the best answer. Dell's Travis North said while conventional liquid metal has great thermal conductivity, it's also electrically conductive, which isn't great in a computer where it can potentially short out components.