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Terminator Takes a Step Closer to Reality

#artificialintelligence

The truth is often stranger than fiction is a well-known adage. Whether this is true for science fiction or not is a subject for debate. Science does however tend to move steadily towards a reality that was originally portrayed as science fiction. Solid-state components with semiconducting devices and fixed metallic tracks are used for modern electronic technologies like computers and smart phones. Being able to create truly elastic electronic components is a dream that is slowly but surely being realized.


Terminator-style liquid metal morphs into physical shapes

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

UK-based researchers have applied electrical charges to manipulate liquid metal into 2D shapes, bringing to mind the terrifying T-1000 character in the Terminator film franchise, which comes to life from a pool of similar material. Jim Drury reports Video provided by Reuters Newslook


A liquid metal reaction environment for the room-temperature synthesis of atomically thin metal oxides

Science

Two-dimensional (2D) oxides have a wide variety of applications in electronics and other technologies. However, many oxides are not easy to synthesize as 2D materials through conventional methods. We used nontoxic eutectic gallium-based alloys as a reaction solvent and co-alloyed desired metals into the melt. On the basis of thermodynamic considerations, we predicted the composition of the self-limiting interfacial oxide. We isolated the surface oxide as a 2D layer, either on substrates or in suspension.


Scientists develop Terminator-style stretchable liquid metal

Daily Mail - Science & tech

A new host of liquid metals that have applications towards soft robotics are making movies like'The Terminator' transcend make-believe. According to researchers, experimental liquid metals like gallium and other alloys, when supplemented with nickel or iron, are able to flex and mold into shapes with the use of magnets, much like the iconic movie villain, T-1000 from'The Terminator 2: Judgement Day.' While other such metals have been developed, they contended with two major drawbacks. A new host of liquid metals that have applications towards soft robotics are making movies like'The Terminator' transcend make-believe toward real life. Researchers say experimental liquid metals like gallium and other alloys, when supplemented with nickel or iron, are able to flex and mold into shapes with the use of magnets. A new material revealed by the American Chemical Society solves to major problems experienced by similar substances.


Listen to a bendy audio speaker made from liquid heavy metal

New Scientist

A bendy audio speaker literally made from liquid heavy metal could prove useful for the next generation of wearable technology. Flexible speakers be the key to better, wearable music listening devices, says Jeong Sook Ha of Korea University, but that will require alternatives to the rigid loudspeakers and microphones we use today. Ha and her colleagues have developed a loudspeaker that plays a range of sounds, from piano notes to human voices, even when bent (watch the video below).