Facebook Under Fire: How Privacy Crisis Could Change Big Data Forever

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In 2004, when Mark Zuckerberg was a Harvard undergrad working on a skunkworks project called The Facebook, a friend asked him how he'd managed to obtain more than 4,000 emails, photos and other bits of personal info from fellow students. They'trust me,'" Zuckerberg wrote in an instant-messaging exchange leaked to website Silicon Alley Insider. The guy who would become CEO of one of the world's biggest tech giants added, "Dumb f--s." Zuckerberg later expressed regret for those disdainful remarks in a 2010 New Yorker interview, saying he had "grown and learned a lot." Today, the Facebook co-founder, now 33, is facing his toughest grown-up test yet -- steering his global enterprise through a data-privacy crisis that has angered users, led panicked investors to sell the stock and drawn intense scrutiny from lawmakers and regulators worldwide.


Mastercard's Big Data For Good Initiative: Data Philanthropy On The Front Lines

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FILE - In this Thursday, April 25, 2013, file photo, MasterCard credit cards are displayed for a photographer in Montpelier, Vt. MasterCard Inc. reports financial results Friday, Oct. 28, 2016. Much has been written about big data initiatives and the efforts of market leaders to derive critical business insights faster. Less has been written about initiatives by some of these same firms to apply big data and analytics to a different set of issues, which are not solely focused on revenue growth or bottom line profitability. While the focus of most writing has been on the use of data for competitive advantage, a small set of companies has been undertaking, with much less fanfare, a range of initiatives designed to ensure that data can be applied not just for corporate good, but also for social good.


eBay Inc.: eBay Agrees to Acquire SalesPredict - The Wall Street Transcript

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Today eBay announced it will acquire SalesPredict, an Israel-based company that leverages advanced analytics to predict customer buying behavior and sales conversion. SalesPredict is eBay's latest acquisition that will support its artificial intelligence, machine learning and data science efforts. It follows eBay's recent acquisition of Expertmaker, in order to further bolster our structured data efforts. Financial terms of the deal were not disclosed. Upon the close of the transaction, a number of SalesPredict's employees will join eBay's structured data organization, working from eBay's Israeli Development Center in Netanya.


Cloudera and Hortonworks Complete Planned Merger

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Combination creates open-source powerhouse to build industry's first Enterprise Data Cloud from the Edge to AI PALO ALTO, Calif., January 3, 2019 -- Cloudera, Inc. (NYSE: CLDR), the enterprise data cloud company, today announced completion of its merger with Hortonworks, Inc. Cloudera will deliver the first enterprise data cloud - unlocking the power of any data, running in any cloud from the Edge to AI, on a 100% open-source data platform. An enterprise data cloud supports both hybrid and multi-cloud deployments, providing enterprises with the flexibility to perform machine learning and analytics with their data, their way, with no lock-in. "Today, we start an exciting new chapter for Cloudera as we become the leading enterprise data cloud provider," said Tom Reilly, chief executive officer of Cloudera. "This combined team and technology portfolio establish the new Cloudera as a clear market leader with the scale and resources to drive continued innovation and growth. We will provide customers a comprehensive solution-set to bring the right data analytics to data anywhere the enterprise needs to work, from the Edge to AI, with the industry's first Enterprise Data Cloud."


Xconomy: Samsung, Google Back Tamr as Big Data Startups Try to Find Their Way

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Businesses have sunk a lot of money into software tools to analyze the reams of data they're generating, in search of insights that might help them increase sales or cut costs. But analytics tools don't work effectively unless the data can be easily retrieved from a company's disparate systems and storage locations, and the information is cleaned up (think paring down redundant data, fixing typos, and putting data in the right format). That predicament has led to a wave of startups peddling software for data "scrubbing," "wrangling," "curation," "unification," and other buzzwords that boil down to helping businesses manage and prepare data for analysis. Andy Palmer, CEO and co-founder of one of those startups, Tamr, thinks the market for such products is maturing. Today, his Cambridge, MA-based company announced it raised $18 million in new venture funding to try and grab a bigger piece of the pie.