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Alphabet's Next Billion-Dollar Business: 10 Industries To Watch - CB Insights Research

#artificialintelligence

Alphabet is using its dominance in the search and advertising spaces -- and its massive size -- to find its next billion-dollar business. From healthcare to smart cities to banking, here are 10 industries the tech giant is targeting. With growing threats from its big tech peers Microsoft, Apple, and Amazon, Alphabet's drive to disrupt has become more urgent than ever before. The conglomerate is leveraging the power of its first moats -- search and advertising -- and its massive scale to find its next billion-dollar businesses. To protect its current profits and grow more broadly, Alphabet is edging its way into industries adjacent to the ones where it has already found success and entering new spaces entirely to find opportunities for disruption. Evidence of Alphabet's efforts is showing up in several major industries. For example, the company is using artificial intelligence to understand the causes of diseases like diabetes and cancer and how to treat them. Those learnings feed into community health projects that serve the public, and also help Alphabet's effort to build smart cities. Elsewhere, Alphabet is using its scale to build a better virtual assistant and own the consumer electronics software layer. It's also leveraging that scale to build a new kind of Google Pay-operated checking account. In this report, we examine how Alphabet and its subsidiaries are currently working to disrupt 10 major industries -- from electronics to healthcare to transportation to banking -- and what else might be on the horizon. Within the world of consumer electronics, Alphabet has already found dominance with one product: Android. Mobile operating system market share globally is controlled by the Linux-based OS that Google acquired in 2005 to fend off Microsoft and Windows Mobile. Today, however, Alphabet's consumer electronics strategy is being driven by its work in artificial intelligence. Google is building some of its own hardware under the Made by Google line -- including the Pixel smartphone, the Chromebook, and the Google Home -- but the company is doing more important work on hardware-agnostic software products like Google Assistant (which is even available on iOS).


The Automated Copywriter: Algorithmic Rephrasing of Health-Related Advertisements to Improve their Performance

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Search advertising is one of the most commonly-used methods of advertising. Past work has shown that search advertising can be employed to improve health by eliciting positive behavioral change. However, writing effective advertisements requires expertise and (possible expensive) experimentation, both of which may not be available to public health authorities wishing to elicit such behavioral changes, especially when dealing with a public health crises such as epidemic outbreaks. Here we develop an algorithm which builds on past advertising data to train a sequence-to-sequence Deep Neural Network which "translates" advertisements into optimized ads that are more likely to be clicked. The network is trained using more than 114 thousands ads shown on Microsoft Advertising. We apply this translator to two health related domains: Medical Symptoms (MS) and Preventative Healthcare (PH) and measure the improvements in click-through rates (CTR). Our experiments show that the generated ads are predicted to have higher CTR in 81% of MS ads and 76% of PH ads. To understand the differences between the generated ads and the original ones we develop estimators for the affective attributes of the ads. We show that the generated ads contain more calls-to-action and that they reflect higher valence (36% increase) and higher arousal (87%) on a sample of 1000 ads. Finally, we run an advertising campaign where 10 random ads and their rephrased versions from each of the domains are run in parallel. We show an average improvement in CTR of 68% for the generated ads compared to the original ads. Our results demonstrate the ability to automatically optimize advertisement for the health domain. We believe that our work offers health authorities an improved ability to help nudge people towards healthier behaviors while saving the time and cost needed to optimize advertising campaigns.


Temporarily Unavailable: Memory Inhibition in Cognitive and Computer Science

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Inhibition can take place at the level of neurotransmitters in the synaptic cleft, neurons can inhibit each other's fire rate, it can be s h own at a physiological level - for instance by measuring the EEG, and finally it can be investigated on a purely behavioral level. Behavioral inhibition typically means something like'making a content/action less accessible or suppressing it altogether' in order to enhance processing of relevant information . In cognition, thus, the concept of inhibition implies cognitive mechanisms that actively lower currently irrelevant or inter fering information. Psychological theories that posit the existence of inhibitory mechanisms in our mind have elicited much research across diverse fields of C ognitive P sychology like perception, attention, action control, and memory but have also been tra nsferred to other research fields like D evelopmental P sychology as, fo r instance, understanding the aging brain or the developing brain is closely linked to understanding how the brain handles irrelevant or interfering information - that is how or whether the brain can inhibit such information. The two areas in Cognitive Psychology in which inhibition is traditionally investigated to the largest extent are the research fields of attention and memory. In attention research, typically the interference due to distracting stimuli or actions is analyzed in experimental paradigms that try to tap a specific form of cognitive inhibition. For example, in the Negative Priming task (for a review, Frings, Schneider, & Fox, 2015) it is typically analyzed how an irrelevant distractor stimulus is inhibited. In the cuing task that elicits the inhibition of return effect (Posner, Choate, Rafal, & Vaughn, 1985) it is typically analyzed how an irrelevant location is inhibited. In task switchin g (Kiesel et al., 2010) lowering competition by a just previously performed task while currently executing a novel task is achieved by inhibiting that previous task.


Toward Fairness in AI for People with Disabilities: A Research Roadmap

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

AI technologies have the potential to dramatically impact the lives of people with disabilities (PWD). Indeed, improving the lives of PWD is a motivator for many state-of-the-art AI systems, such as automated speech recognition tools that can caption videos for people who are deaf and hard of hearing, or language prediction algorithms that can augment communication for people with speech or cognitive disabilities. However, widely deployed AI systems may not work properly for PWD, or worse, may actively discriminate against them. These considerations regarding fairness in AI for PWD have thus far received little attention. In this position paper, we identify potential areas of concern regarding how several AI technology categories may impact particular disability constituencies if care is not taken in their design, development, and testing. We intend for this risk assessment of how various classes of AI might interact with various classes of disability to provide a roadmap for future research that is needed to gather data, test these hypotheses, and build more inclusive algorithms.