AI-driven robot hand spent hundred years teaching itself to rotate cube

#artificialintelligence

AI researchers have demonstrated a self-teaching algorithm that gives a robot hand remarkable new dexterity. Their creation taught itself to manipulate a cube with uncanny skill by practicing for the equivalent of a hundred years inside a computer simulation (though only a few days in real time). The robotic hand is still nowhere near as agile as a human one, and far too clumsy to be deployed in a factory or a warehouse. Even so, the research shows the potential for machine learning to unlock new robotic capabilities. It also suggests that someday robots might teach themselves new skills inside virtual worlds, which could greatly speed up the process of programming or training them.


AI-driven robot hand spent hundred years teaching itself to rotate cube

#artificialintelligence

AI researchers have demonstrated a self-teaching algorithm that gives a robot hand remarkable new dexterity. Their creation taught itself to manipulate a cube with uncanny skill by practicing for the equivalent of a hundred years inside a computer simulation (though only a few days in real time). The robotic hand is still nowhere near as agile as a human one, and far too clumsy to be deployed in a factory or a warehouse. Even so, the research shows the potential for machine learning to unlock new robotic capabilities. It also suggests that some day robots might teach themselves new skills inside virtual worlds, which could greatly speed up the process of programming or training them.


OpenAI's AI-powered robot learned how to solve a Rubik's cube one-handed

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Artificial intelligence research organization OpenAI has achieved a new milestone in its quest to build general purpose, self-learning robots. The group's robotics division says Dactyl, its humanoid robotic hand first developed last year, has learned to solve a Rubik's cube one-handed. OpenAI sees the feat as a leap forward both for the dexterity of robotic appendages and its own AI software, which allows Dactyl to learn new tasks using virtual simulations before it is presented with a real, physical challenge to overcome. In a demonstration video showcasing Dactyl's new talent, we can see the robotic hand fumble its way toward a complete cube solve with clumsy yet accurate maneuvers. It takes many minutes, but Dactyl is eventually able to solve the puzzle.


OpenAI's AI-powered robot learned how to solve a Rubik's cube one-handed

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence research organization OpenAI has achieved a new milestone in its quest to build general purpose, self-learning robots. The group's robotics division says Dactyl, its humanoid robotic hand first developed last year, has learned to solve a Rubik's cube one-handed. OpenAI sees the feat as a leap forward both for the dexterity of robotic appendages and its own AI software, which allows Dactyl to learn new tasks using virtual simulations before it is presented with a real, physical challenge to overcome. In a demonstration video showcasing Dactyl's new talent, we can see the robotic hand fumble its way toward a complete cube solve with clumsy yet accurate maneuvers. It takes many minutes, but Dactyl is eventually able to solve the puzzle.


OpenAI's Dactyl improves Dexterity of Robotic Hands without Human Input

#artificialintelligence

OpenAI has trained a human-like robot hand to manipulate physical objects with unprecedented dexterity. Their system, called Dactyl, is trained entirely in simulation and transfers its knowledge to reality, adapting to real-world physics. Dactyl learns from scratch using the same general-purpose reinforcement learning algorithm and code as OpenAI Five. The results show that it's possible to train agents in simulation and have them solve real-world tasks, without physically-accurate modeling of the world. Dactyl is a system for manipulating objects using a Shadow Dexterous Hand.