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Waymo emails customers saying self-driving taxis will pick up passengers without a back-up driver

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Waymo has emailed a select group or customers to notify them that'completely driverless cars are on the way'. The former Google project could soon unleash an autonomous taxi fleet without a human backup driver at the wheel. The email notes that customers who are matched with a fully driverless vehicle in its ride-hailing app will be notified so they won't be surprised to see an empty front seat when the car arrives. Waymo has emailed a select group or customers to notify them that'completely driverless cars are on the way'. Both early Waymo and Waymo One customers have received the email, which says the firm has been has been testing and refining its self-driving tech and that the riders may see Waymo vehicles that have no safety driver behind the wheel.


Your self-driving taxi is on its way! Waymo rolls out driverless ride-hailing service in Phoenix

Daily Mail - Science & tech

It has been more than a decade in the making, but Waymo's self-driving taxis are officially picking up passengers without a human operator at the wheel. A group of early rider program members in Phoenix, Arizona received a message on this week offering them a free ride with the fully driverless service. Once the passenger is seated and the ride is underway, the car dials Waymo support to address any questions or concerns about the driverless ride – as many riders have never been carted around by a robot. It has been more than a decade in the making, but Waymo's self-driving taxis are officially picking up passengers without a human operator at the wheel. This car is all yours, with no one up front,' the pop-up notification from the Waymo app reads.


Waymo boss says his tech would have averted fatal Uber Arizona crash

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Uber's self-driving cars were 400 times worse than Waymo before the fatal Arizona crash, according to a leaked internal report. The firm's cars were unable to reach 13 miles (21km) without human intervention, while cars made by the Google subsidiary Waymo could drive 5,600 miles (9,000km). According to a 100-page company document, Uber was also struggling to meet various other safety goals in the weeks before the crash. For instance, the cars were having trouble driving through construction zones and next to tall vehicles. The CEO of Google's Waymo has since said that the recent death of a pedestrian in an accident involving an autonomous Uber car would not have occurred with his company's technology.


Mercedes boss Daimler teams up with Bosch to launch fleet of driverless taxis in California

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Mercedes Benz owner Daimler is teaming up with Bosch to launch a fleet of driverless taxis in California's Silicon Valley next year. It is part of a program to test vehicles designed for city driving in an attempt to keep up with the likes of Waymo and Uber. The world's largest maker of premium cars and biggest automotive supplier gave few details about their robo-taxi program, described as a passenger shuttle service, and did not reveal which city would host it. Mercedes boss Daimler is teaming up with Bosch to launch a fleet of driverless taxis in California's Silicon Valley next year. Negotiations with the municipality within the sprawling technology hub of Silicon Valley were still underway, spokespersons for the companies said on a conference call with journalists.


Fleet of six driverless Ford Mondeos to be tested in Oxford for the next five months

Daily Mail - Science & tech

A fleet of six self-driving Ford Mondeos will be navigating the streets of Oxford in all hours and all weathers to test the abilities of driverless cars as part of a new trial. Technology firm Oxbotica, spun out of an Oxford University project, has retrofitted the vehicles which are following a nine-mile round trip within the city. A dozen cameras, three Lidar sensors, two radar sensors are used to put the car at'level 4 autonomy', meaning it can handle almost all situations itself. A person needs to be in the driving seat by law, but they won't be touching the steering wheel or pedals, the driverless car will be'taking them for a ride'. The Oxford trial is part of the UK government-backed £12.3 million Endeavour project, set up to try deploying a fleet of self-driving cars in several cities.