Goto

Collaborating Authors

Breast cancer: One-dose radiotherapy 'as effective as full course'

BBC News

A single targeted dose of radiotherapy could be as effective at treating breast cancer as a full course, a long-term study suggests. Researchers said people who received the shorter treatment were also less likely to die of other cancers and heart disease in the following five years. But cancer specialists have raised concerns about the study's methodology. A fifth of patients in the study received extra doses of radiotherapy. The study's lead author, Prof Jayant Vaidya, said he had expected a proportion of the women to need extra radiotherapy, since post-op tests could reveal tumours were bigger or more aggressive than expected.


Google DeepMind teams up with London hospitals to put machine learning to work against head and neck cancers

#artificialintelligence

Google's machine learning subsidiary DeepMind has kicked off a new research partnership with the radiotherapy department at the University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, a provider organization that specializes in cancer treatment. DeepMind and clinicians in UCLH's radiotherapy team are exploring whether machine learning methods can reduce the amount of time it takes to plan radiotherapy treatment for cancers of the head and neck. To that end, 1 in 75 men and 1 in 150 women will be diagnosed with oral cancer during their lifetime, and oral cavity cancer has risen by 92 percent since the 1970s, DeepMind said. Head and neck cancer in general affects more than 11,000 patients in the U.K. alone each year, the firm added. "Advances in treatment such as radiotherapy have improved survival rates, but because of the high number of delicate structures concentrated in this area of the body, clinicians have to plan treatment extremely carefully to ensure none of the vital nerves or organs are damaged," DeepMind said.


Google DeepMind AI to help doctors treat head and neck cancers ZDNet

#artificialintelligence

Google's DeepMind is aiming to help cut the time spent identifying key areas to treat, and avoid, in radiotherapy. Google's DeepMind is partnering with the UK's NHS to explore how machine learning could help doctors treat head and neck cancers. DeepMind, the Google subsidiary that beat a human contestant in the notoriously complex game of Go and is helping cut Google's datacenter costs, will be conducting cancer treatment research at the Radiotherapy Department at University College London Hospitals (UCLH) NHS Foundation Trust. While privacy and regulation will slow the pace of adoption, AI will bring some profound changes to healthcare. As the AI-research unit notes in a blog post, radiotherapy involving sensitive parts of the body, such as the mouth and sinuses, requires careful planning prior to treatment to avoid damaging key nerves and organs.


Applying machine learning to radiotherapy planning for head & neck cancer DeepMind

#artificialintelligence

We're excited to announce a new research partnership with the Radiotherapy Department at University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, which provides world-leading cancer treatment. Head and neck cancer in general affects over 11,000 patients in the UK alone each year. Advances in treatment such as radiotherapy have improved survival rates, but because of the high number of delicate structures concentrated in this area of the body, clinicians have to plan treatment extremely carefully to ensure none of the vital nerves or organs are damaged. That makes a cancer at the back of the mouth or in the sinuses, for example, particularly hard to treat with radiotherapy. The process, known as segmentation, involves drawing around different parts of the anatomy and feeding the information through to a radiotherapy machine, which can then target cancers while leaving healthy tissue unharmed.


Teen one of first UK proton-beam patients

BBC News

Fifteen-year-old Mason Kettley, who has a rare brain cancer, is about to become one of the first UK patients to have proton-beam therapy, at a new dedicated treatment centre. He is starting treatment at the £125m centre at Manchester's Christie hospital. Previously, most patients needing the treatment had to travel abroad. The specialist radiotherapy targets cancers without damaging tissues around the tumours. This is good for children who are at risk of lasting damage to organs that are still growing but it is available in only a handful of countries around the world.