Elevated opioid risks found at Native American hospitals: federal audit

The Japan Times

FLAGSTAFF, ARIZONA - U.S. government hospitals put Native American patients at increased risk for opioid abuse and overdoses, failing to follow their own protocols for prescribing and dispensing the drugs, according to a federal audit made public Monday. The report by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Inspector General does not say whether patients suffered because of the hospitals' practices. But all five Indian Health Service hospitals that were reviewed had patients who were given opioids in amounts exceeding federal guidelines, the report said. "There are vulnerabilities with this particular population in the opioid prescribing and dispensing practices," said Carla Lewis, one of the auditors. The overdose epidemic that has killed more people than any other drug epidemic in U.S. history has hit indigenous communities hard.


Where Are The Best Hospitals In The US? California Graded On Deaths And Injuries

International Business Times

Nearly half of California hospitals received a grade of C or lower for patient safety on a national report card aimed at prodding medical centers to do more to prevent injuries and deaths. The Leapfrog Group, an employer-backed nonprofit group focused on health care quality, issued its latest scores last week. The report card is part of an effort to make consumers and employers aware of how their hospitals perform on key quality measures, so they can make better-informed health care decisions. The scores are updated twice a year, in spring and fall. After steady improvement in recent years, California hospitals lost ground in last week's report card.


Hospital software often doesn't flag unsafe drug prescriptions, report finds

PBS NewsHour

Medical errors are estimated to be the third-highest cause of death in the country. Experts and patient safety advocates are trying to change that. But at least one of the tools that's been considered a fix isn't yet working as well as it should, suggests a report released Thursday. That's according to the Leapfrog Group, a nonprofit organization known for rating hospitals on patient safety. While a vast majority of hospitals surveyed had some kind of computer-based medication system in place, the systems still fall short in catching possible problems.


Hospital Software Often Doesn't Flag Unsafe Drug Prescriptions, Report Finds

U.S. News

Medical errors are estimated to be the third-highest cause of death in the country. Experts and patient safety advocates are trying to change that. But at least one of the tools that's been considered a fix isn't yet working as well as it should, suggests a report released Thursday. That's according to the Leapfrog Group, a nonprofit organization known for rating hospitals on patient safety. While a vast majority of hospitals surveyed had some kind of computer-based medication system in place, the systems still fall short in catching possible problems.


Fight against Cancer: IBM's Watson plays doctor at Manipal Hospitals

#artificialintelligence

Cancer is fast turning into an epidemic in India.According to a study by The National Cancer Institute (NCI), every 13th new cancer patient in the world is an Indian. In 2016, the total number of new cancer cases is anticipated to be around 14.5 lakh and that figure is likely to reach nearly 17.3 lakh in 2020, as per a study by The Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR). Such numbers exacerbate the magnitude of healthcare issues in the country. The first step towards addressing this mammoth task is access to healthcare. The country also needs to integrate technology into the healthcare system.