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Google's AI chief says forget Elon Musk's killer robots, and worry about bias in AI systems instead

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Google's AI chief isn't fretting about super-intelligent killer robots. Instead, John Giannandrea is concerned about the danger that may be lurking inside the machine-learning algorithms used to make millions of decisions every minute. "The real safety question, if you want to call it that, is that if we give these systems biased data, they will be biased," Giannandrea said before a recent Google conference on the relationship between humans and AI systems. The problem of bias in machine learning is likely to become more significant as the technology spreads to critical areas like medicine and law, and as more people without a deep technical understanding are tasked with deploying it. Some experts warn that algorithmic bias is already pervasive in many industries, and that almost no one is making an effort to identify or correct it (see "Biased Algorithms Are Everywhere, and No One Seems to Care").


Google's AI chief says forget Elon Musk's killer robots, and worry about bias in AI systems instead

#artificialintelligence

Instead, John Giannandrea is concerned about the danger that may be lurking inside the machine-learning algorithms used to make millions of decisions every minute. "The real safety question, if you want to call it that, is that if we give these systems biased data, they will be biased," Giannandrea said before a recent Google conference on the relationship between humans and AI systems. The problem of bias in machine learning is likely to become more significant as the technology spreads to critical areas like medicine and law, and as more people without a deep technical understanding are tasked with deploying it. Some experts warn that algorithmic bias is already pervasive in many industries, and that almost no one is making an effort to identify or correct it (see "Biased Algorithms Are Everywhere, and No One Seems to Care"). "It's important that we be transparent about the training data that we are using, and are looking for hidden biases in it, otherwise we are building biased systems," Giannandrea added.


Google's AI chief says forget Elon Musk's killer robots, and worry about bias in AI systems instead

#artificialintelligence

Google's AI chief isn't fretting about super-intelligent killer robots. Instead, John Giannandrea is concerned about the danger that may be lurking inside the machine-learning algorithms used to make millions of decisions every minute. "The real safety question, if you want to call it that, is that if we give these systems biased data, they will be biased," Giannandrea said before a recent Google conference on the relationship between humans and AI systems. The problem of bias in machine learning is likely to become more significant as the technology spreads to critical areas like medicine and law, and as more people without a deep technical understanding are tasked with deploying it. Some experts warn that algorithmic bias is already pervasive in many industries, and that almost no one is making an effort to identify or correct it (see "Biased Algorithms Are Everywhere, and No One Seems to Care").


Apple hires Google's artificial intelligence chief WRAL TechWire

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Apple has hired Google's chief of search and artificial intelligence, John Giannandrea, a major coup in its bid to catch up to the artificial intelligence technology of its rivals. Apple said Tuesday that Giannandrea will run Apple's "machine learning and AI strategy," and become one of 16 executives who report directly to Apple's chief executive, Tim Cook. The hire is a victory for Apple, which many Silicon Valley executives and analysts view as lagging its peers in artificial intelligence, an increasingly crucial technology for companies that enable computers to handle more complex tasks, like understanding voice commands or identifying people in images. "Our technology must be infused with the values we all hold dear," Cook said Tuesday morning in an email to staff members obtained by The New York Times. "John shares our commitment to privacy and our thoughtful approach as we make computers even smarter and more personal."


Google sharpens focus on AI for search

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Mumbai: Typing a query in an online search box is straightforward for users. It's not so for search engines that have to crawl trillions of pages, track links on them, sort them by content, then index the pages and also have their algorithms understand what the queries mean before dishing out the answers--all in less than a second. More so, for a company like Google, which processes billions of searches daily--making search "core" to the company's mission of organizing "the world's information" and making it "universally accessible and useful". When Google was founded in September 1998, it was serving around 10,000 search queries per day. The company now processes more than 40,000 every second on average, which translates to over 3.5 billion searches per day and 1.2 trillion per year worldwide, according to internetstatslive.com.