From the Web to Real Life: The Growing Threat of Online-Bred Right-Wing Extremism

Der Spiegel International

At around 1:30 p.m. on a recent Friday afternoon, some people on 8chan, an online message board, watched a mass murder unfold. Brenton Tarrant had just announced he would carry out a deadly attack and stream it live on Facebook. The first fans quickly voiced their support. "Good luck," one user wrote; another: "Sounds fun." A third person wrote that it was the "best start to a weekend ever." When Tarrant's head-mounted camera showed him murdering the first person at the entrance to the Al Noor Mosque in Christchurch, New Zealand -- someone who had just greeted him kindly -- a fourth person wrote, "Holy fuck nice shootin." Around 200 Facebook users watched through their smartphones, tablets or computers as the 28-year-old got out of his car, opened his trunk where he kept his weapons, and began killing 50 people in and around two mosques. His victims included children, like the 3-year-old Mucad Ibrahim; students, like the 14-year-old Sayyad Milne; men, like the father Khaled Mustafa, and women, like Husne Ara Parvin, who was gunned down while trying to protect her wheelchair-bound husband. A mass killing of Muslims, documented in real time, filmed in the style of a first-person-shooter video game and cheered on like a football match. "This is how we win," a fifth person wrote. It's hard to imagine a greater contempt for humanity. None of the 200 users flagged the video to Facebook, and thousands of people have watched the livestream after the fact. The social network, whose CEO, Mark Zuckerberg, likes to brag about the tens of thousands of moderators on its payroll who constantly monitor content, didn't notice anything at first. Facebook didn't receive the first notice until 12 minutes after the livestream ended.


From the Web to Real Life: The Growing Threat of Online-Bred Right-Wing Extremism

Der Spiegel International

At around 1:30 p.m. on a recent Friday afternoon, some people on 8chan, an online message board, watched a mass murder unfold. Brenton Tarrant had just announced he would carry out a deadly attack and stream it live on Facebook. The first fans quickly voiced their support. "Good luck," one user wrote; another: "Sounds fun." A third person wrote that it was the "best start to a weekend ever." When Tarrant's head-mounted camera showed him murdering the first person at the entrance to the Al Noor Mosque in Christchurch, New Zealand -- someone who had just greeted him kindly -- a fourth person wrote, "Holy fuck nice shootin." Around 200 Facebook users watched through their smartphones, tablets or computers as the 28-year-old got out of his car, opened his trunk where he kept his weapons, and began killing 50 people in and around two mosques. His victims included children, like the 3-year-old Mucad Ibrahim; students, like the 14-year-old Sayyad Milne; men, like the father Khaled Mustafa, and women, like Husne Ara Parvin, who was gunned down while trying to protect her wheelchair-bound husband. A mass killing of Muslims, documented in real time, filmed in the style of a first-person-shooter video game and cheered on like a football match. "This is how we win," a fifth person wrote. It's hard to imagine a greater contempt for humanity. None of the 200 users flagged the video to Facebook, and thousands of people have watched the livestream after the fact. The social network, whose CEO, Mark Zuckerberg, likes to brag about the tens of thousands of moderators on its payroll who constantly monitor content, didn't notice anything at first. Facebook didn't receive the first notice until 12 minutes after the livestream ended.


New Zealand mosque attacks: What we know so far

Al Jazeera

Two mosques in the city of Christchurch in New Zealand were attacked on Friday, with at least 49 people killed and more than 40 others wounded as Muslims worshipped. During afternoon prayers on Friday - Islam's holy day - a gunman opened fire inside the Masjid al Noor mosque in central Christchurch, killing 41 people. Another seven were slain at a second mosque five kilometres away in suburban Linwood, three of them outside the building. The remaining victim died at hospital. Witnesses said some victims were shot at close range.


Man in New Zealand quits his job to play Pokemon Go full-time

BBC News

A man in New Zealand has quit his job to play Pokemon Go full-time. Tom Currie worked as a barista and bartender at a seaside restaurant on the Hibiscus Coast near Auckland, but has decided to jack that in to find digital creatures on his phone instead. He says he's relying on friends and family to help out but admits his parents are "a little bit baffled". "When I resigned, I didn't tell my manager I was going out into the world to hunt Pokemon," he told Newsbeat. "But after my story got picked up I gave him a courtesy call to update him just in case the media contacted him.


Spark NZ launches IoT network across New Zealand

ZDNet

New Zealand mobile telecommunications company Spark NZ has announced the launch of its Internet of Things (IoT) network, which is currently available in "60 percent of the places New Zealanders live and work." The LoRaWAN IoT network has been switched on in Auckland, Wellington, Christchurch, Hamilton, Tauranga, Rotorua, Palmerston North, Shannon, Blenheim, Nelson, and Dunedin. It will additionally provide coverage by June 2018 to Queenstown, Whangarei, Pukekohe, Gisborne, Napier, Taupo, New Plymouth, Whanganui, Timaru, Hastings, and Invercargill, with the latter two to go live within weeks. The network consists of gateways and antennas installed atop Spark NZ's 4G cell sites, with the telco using Actility's ThingPark Wireless platform, Kerlink's gateways, and Kordia to build and maintain the network. Spark NZ said it will enable business and local governments to deploy sensors across infrastructure including vehicles, machinery, rubbish bins, car parks, and livestock, with the telco saying it would cost around AU$1.79 per cow to connect each month to track location and body temperature.