Uber could offer self-driving drone taxis in cities within the next ten years

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Forget self-driving cars, soon you could be travelling around the city in self-driving drones. The taxi-finding app Uber is researching the plausibility of using vertical takeoff aircraft to fly its customers around cities. The technology could be available within a decade, according to Jeff Holden, head of products at Uber. Forget self-driving cars, soon you could be travelling around a city in self-driving drones. Artist's concept of a vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) aircraft being developed by Aurora Flight Sciences for the US military is shown Jeff Holden, head of products at Uber told Recode he has been researching the idea of self-driving drones, so the company'can someday offer our customers as many options as possible to move around.' Mr Holden said landing on top of buildings in cities would help reduce commuting time and congestion dramatically.


Life in the kill box: 'Eye in the Sky' targets the ethics of drone strikes

#artificialintelligence

You might think of drones as friendly things, like the DJI Phantom you fly yourself or those Amazon drones that could soon be delivering your groceries. Think again when it comes to military drones. An MQ-9 Reaper unmanned aerial vehicle with a 66-foot wingspan can loiter 50,000 feet above the Earth for a day at a time, poised to hit a target with a devastating 3,800 pounds of Hellfire missile payload. But as with all weapons, the awesome firepower of a drone needs to be aimed accurately. "It's less about technology than about strategy, about the way it's deployed," said Gavin Hood, director of drone drama "Eye in the Sky," out now on DVD and Blu-ray.


Drones will soon decide who to kill

#artificialintelligence

The US Army recently announced that it is developing the first drones that can spot and target vehicles and people using artificial intelligence (AI). This is a big step forward. Whereas current military drones are still controlled by people, this new technology will decide who to kill with almost no human involvement. Once complete, these drones will represent the ultimate militarization of AI and trigger vast legal and ethical implications for wider society. There is a chance that warfare will move from fighting to extermination, losing any semblance of humanity in the process.


Drones will soon decide who to kill

#artificialintelligence

The US Army recently announced that it is developing the first drones that can spot and target vehicles and people using artificial intelligence (AI). This is a big step forward. Whereas current military drones are still controlled by people, this new technology will decide who to kill with almost no human involvement. Once complete, these drones will represent the ultimate militarisation of AI and trigger vast legal and ethical implications for wider society. There is a chance that warfare will move from fighting to extermination, losing any semblance of humanity in the process.


Self-driving cars: overlooking data privacy is a car crash waiting to happen

The Guardian

States across the US are scrambling to figure out how to regulate self-driving cars, wearable technologies that track our health, smart homes that constantly monitor their infrastructure and the rest of the devices emerging from the so-called "internet of things" (IoT). The result is a smattering of incomplete and inconsistent law that could depress the upside of the technology without really addressing its risks. What's most notable about these early regulatory attempts is not that they are varied – that is to be expected. It's that the regulations deal mostly with physical safety, leaving privacy and cybersecurity issues almost wholly unexamined. This seems to be a pattern now, true too of drone regulation, where regulatory bodies have jurisdiction over physical threats, not informational ones.