Rail travellers could pay for train journey by finger print or iris scan under new plans

The Independent - Tech

The rail industry has come up with a plan that may as well be out of a science-fiction movie to cope with growing demand and overcrowding: charging rail passengers for journeys by fingerprint or iris scan. The Rail Delivery Group (RDG), the organisation representing train operators and Network Rail, claims biometric technology would enable fares to be automatically charged marking the start of an era that could radically accelerate commute times. The technology represents the next step from travellers being able to us smartphones' Bluetooth signals to open station barriers. That will be trialled on Chiltern Railways' route between London Marylebone and Oxford Parkway over the coming months. The use of digital signalling technology will also allow trains to operate closer together, cutting delay, according to the RDG.


New facial recognition technology catches THREE immigration cheats at Washington airport

Daily Mail

New facial recognition technology has identified three immigration cheats at one of America's busiest airports - in just forty days. The trio - who travelled separately during August and September - were intercepted at Washington's Dulles International Airport, which processes more than 21 million people per year. According to a statement by U.S. Customs and Border Protection, they were each flagged-up by new software which scans minute differences between the person seeking entry and their passport photo. Impressively, mismatches are identified in as little as two seconds. Most recently, on Monday, a woman arriving on a flight from Accra, Ghana, presented a U.S. passport with a suspect image.


It Ain't Me, Babe: Researchers Find Flaws In Police Facial Recognition

NPR Technology

Stephen Lamm, a supervisor with the ID fraud unit of the North Carolina Department of Motor Vehicles, looks through photos in a facial recognition system in 2009 in Raleigh, N.C. Stephen Lamm, a supervisor with the ID fraud unit of the North Carolina Department of Motor Vehicles, looks through photos in a facial recognition system in 2009 in Raleigh, N.C. Nearly half of all American adults have been entered into law enforcement facial recognition databases, according to a recent report from Georgetown University's law school. But there are many problems with the accuracy of the technology that could have an impact on a lot of innocent people. There's a good chance your driver's license photo is in one of these databases.


Delta to launch first 'biometric terminal' that lets passengers use facial recognition technology

Daily Mail

Getting through airport security is now as simple as scanning your face. Delta Air Lines today launched what it's calling the first'biometric terminal' in the US at the international terminal in Atlanta's Hartsfield-Jackson airport. Customers use facial recognition to verify their identity as they check in at self-service kiosks, move through security and board their flight. Getting through airport security is now as simple as scanning your face. Delta Air Lines today launched the first'biometric terminal' in the US at Atlanta's Hartsfield-Jackson airport Users enter their passport information on Delta's website during online check-in.


Facial recognition tech catches traveler with fake papers

#artificialintelligence

During just its third day in action, a facial recognition system used by Washington Dulles International Airport (IAD) caught its first imposter. While that's a clear win for proponents of the tech, it might also be major blow to the privacy of the average airline passenger. On Monday, 14 airports in the U.S. launched a pilot program to test the effectiveness of a biometric scanning system during the security and boarding processes. Passengers simply stand in front of a camera that takes their photo. The system then compares that photo to the one on the person's passport to confirm their identity.