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White House Proposes Hands-Off Approach to AI Regulation

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The White House's Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) has issued a draft memo to government agencies which spells out the principles agencies must abide by when creating regulations for the use of AI. The principles are designed to achieve three goals: Ensure public engagement, limit regulatory overreach and promote trustworthy technology. The memo includes 10 principles that agencies must consider when drafting AI regulations. The memo follows on from President Trump's executive order on AI in February 2019, which set out the administration's strategy for accelerating the US's position of leadership in AI. This includes fostering public trust in AI systems by establishing appropriate governance of, and standards for the technology.


Opinion

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At the same time, AI is being twisted by authoritarian regimes to violate rights. The Chinese Communist Party is reportedly using AI to uncover and punish those who criticize the regime's pandemic response and to institute a type of coronavirus social-credit score--assigning people color codes to determine who is free to go out and who will be forced into quarantine. As the world begins to recover from the pandemic, nations face a stark choice about what vision of artificial intelligence will prevail. As Group of Seven nations meet this year under the organization's U.S. presidency, there is a critical opportunity to shape the evolution of AI in a way that respects fundamental rights and upholds our shared values. That is why G-7 technology ministers will agree Thursday to launch the Global Partnership on Artificial Intelligence, or GPAI, together with other democratic countries.


White House Favors a Light Touch in Regulating AI

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The White House has issued principles for regulating the use of artificial intelligence that call for as little government interference as possible and offer only broad guidance to federal agencies. In fact, the principles might deter regulation of AI at a time when many think it is increasingly needed. Michael Kratsios, chief technology officer of the United States, is set to announce the principles on Wednesday at CES in Las Vegas. They arrive at a critical moment for the development of AI and for America's position as the global standard bearer. The guidelines have the potential to shape the development of a broad swath of valuable and critical technologies, from autonomous vehicles to new medical imaging tools.


White House proposes guidelines for regulating the use of artificial intelligence The Star

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The Trump administration is proposing new rules to guide future federal regulation of artificial intelligence used in medicine, transportation and other industries. But the vagueness of the principles announced by the White House is unlikely to satisfy AI watchdogs who have warned of a lack of accountability as computer systems are deployed to take on human roles in high-risk social settings, such as mortgage lending or job recruitment. A document from the White House said that in deciding regulatory action, U.S. agencies "must consider fairness, non-discrimination, openness, transparency, safety, and security." The rules won't affect how federal agencies such as law enforcement use AI; they are specifically limited to how federal agencies devise new AI regulations for the private sector. There's a month-long public comment period before the rules take effect.


White House announces new principles for regulating the use of artificial intelligence

#artificialintelligence

The Trump administration is proposing new rules to guide future federal regulation of artificial intelligence used in medicine, transportation and other industries. But the vagueness of the principles announced by the White House is unlikely to satisfy AI watchdogs who have warned of a lack of accountability as computer systems are deployed to take on human roles in high-risk social settings, such as mortgage lending or job recruitment. The White House said that in deciding regulatory action, U.S. agencies "must consider fairness, non-discrimination, openness, transparency, safety, and security." But federal agencies must also avoid setting up restrictions that "needlessly hamper AI innovation and growth," reads a memo being sent to U.S. agency chiefs from Russell Vought, acting director of the Office of Management and Budget. "Agencies must avoid a precautionary approach that holds AI systems to such an impossibly high standard that society cannot enjoy their benefits," the memo says.