Goto

Collaborating Authors

Kuipers

AAAI Conferences

Humans need morality and ethics to get along constructively as members of the same society. As we face the prospect of robots taking a larger role in society, we need to consider how they, too, should behave toward other members of society. To the extent that robots will be able to act as agents in their own right, as opposed to being simply tools controlled by humans, they will need to behave according to some moral and ethical principles. Inspired by recent research on the cognitive science of human morality, we take steps toward an architecture for morality and ethics in robots. As in humans, there is a rapid intuitive response to the current situation. Reasoned reflection takes place at a slower time-scale, and is focused more on constructing a justification than on revising the reaction. However, there is a yet slower process of social interaction, in which examples of moral judgments and their justifications influence the moral development both of individuals and of the society as a whole. This moral architecture is illustrated by several examples, including identifying research results that will be necessary for the architecture to be implemented.


Kuipers

AAAI Conferences

Humans need morality and ethics to get along constructively as members of the same society. As we face the prospect of robots taking a larger role in society, we need to consider how they, too, should behave toward other members of society. To the extent that robots will be able to act as agents in their own right, as opposed to being simply tools controlled by humans, they will need to behave according to some moral and ethical principles. Inspired by recent research on the cognitive science of human morality, we propose the outlines of an architecture for morality and ethics in robots. As in humans, there is a rapid intuitive response to the current situation. Reasoned reflection takes place at a slower time-scale, and is focused more on constructing a justification than on revising the reaction. However, there is a yet slower process of social interaction, in which both the example of action and its justification influence the moral intuitions of others. The signals an agent provides to others, and the signals received from others, help each agent determine which others are suitable cooperative partners, and which are likely to defect. This moral architecture is illustrated by several examples, including identifying research results that will be necessary for the architecture to be implemented.


Why Machine Ethics?

AITopics Original Links

Machine ethics, machine morality, artificial morality, and computational ethics are all terms for an emerging field of study that seeks to implement moral decision-making faculties in computers and robots. Machine ethics is not merely science fiction but a topic that requires serious consideration given the rapid emergence of increasingly complex autonomous software agents and robots. The authors introduce the issues shaping this new field of enquiry and describe issues regarding the development of artificial moral agents.This article is part of a special issue on Machine Ethics.


A neuroscientist explains: teaching morality to robots – podcast

#artificialintelligence

This week, Observer Magazine columnist and neuroscientist Dr Daniel Glaser visits old friend and former colleague John Morton – emeritus professor at the Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London – to discuss his modelling approach to the human brain. What can it tell us about the developing mind? Could it ever be replicated in silicon? And is true Artificial Intelligence (AI) even possible without crucial stages of development in early life?


The dawn of robot morality The National

#artificialintelligence

How can we programme a robot to behave morally when we don't have a working definition for morality ourselves? This is one of the many questions involved with the field of artificial intelligence and the development of advanced robots. While it might sound like something out of a science fiction novel, artificial intelligence has quickly become a facet of our daily lives. Take Siri or Google Now on our smartphones, and Amazon's Alexa. Rudimentary as they are today, these so-called "smart assistants" represent the future of artificial intelligence.