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World leaders take aim at climate change and Trump

Los Angeles Times

President Trump, who previously announced plans to pull the United States out of the 2015 Paris climate agreement, was not invited to a summit of world and business leaders in the French capital this week to address global warming, but his presence loomed large.


Trump views on climate 'evolving' amid push from Europeans

Associated Press

U.S. President Donald Trump, right, speaks to other G7 Leaders including British Prime Minister Theresa May, center, and French President Emmanuel Macron, third from left, in Taormina, Italy, Friday, May 26, 2017. Leaders of the G7 meet Friday and Saturday, including newcomers Emmanuel Macron of France and Theresa May of Britain in an effort to forge a new dynamic after a year of global political turmoil amid a rise in nationalism. U.S. President Donald Trump, right, speaks to other G7 Leaders including British Prime Minister Theresa May, center, and French President Emmanuel Macron, third from left, in Taormina, Italy, Friday, May 26, 2017. From left, British Prime Minister Theresa May, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, French President Emmanuel Macron, Trump, German Chancellor Angela Merkel, and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe.


Trump views on climate 'evolving' amid push from Europeans

Associated Press

U.S. President Donald Trump, right, speaks to other G7 Leaders including British Prime Minister Theresa May, center, and French President Emmanuel Macron, third from left, in Taormina, Italy, Friday, May 26, 2017. Leaders of the G7 meet Friday and Saturday, including newcomers Emmanuel Macron of France and Theresa May of Britain in an effort to forge a new dynamic after a year of global political turmoil amid a rise in nationalism. U.S. President Donald Trump, right, speaks to other G7 Leaders including British Prime Minister Theresa May, center, and French President Emmanuel Macron, third from left, in Taormina, Italy, Friday, May 26, 2017. From left, British Prime Minister Theresa May, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, French President Emmanuel Macron, Trump, German Chancellor Angela Merkel, and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe.


Tillerson signals U.S. may stay in Paris climate accord if favorable terms can be reached

The Japan Times

WASHINGTON – The United States could remain in the Paris climate accord under the right conditions, Secretary of State Rex Tillerson said on Sunday, signaling a shift in tone from the Trump administration, which angered allies with its decision to pull out of the agreement. President Donald Trump is willing to work with partners in the Paris agreement if the United States could construct a set of terms that are fair and balanced for Americans, Tillerson said on the CBS show "Face The Nation." Asked if there was a chance the United States could stay in the accord, Tillerson responded, "I think under the right conditions." "The president said he is open to finding those conditions where we can remain engaged with others on what we all agree is still a challenging issue," Tillerson said. Trump's national security adviser, H.R. McMaster, struck a similar tone in television interviews on Sunday in which he said Trump had always been willing to consider changes on the climate pact. "He left the door open to re-entering at some later time if there can be a better deal for the United States," said McMaster said on ABC's "This Week" program.


France 'corrects' White House video on Paris accord

Al Jazeera

A day after Donald Trump decided to pull the United States out of the Paris climate deal, the French government has cheekily hit back by releasing a pointed fact-check of the US president's claims about the landmark agreement. France's finance ministry posted a tweet with an embedded link to a video that amounted to a wry but very public rebuttal of Trump's assertions. On Thursday, the White House had tweeted, "The Paris Accord is a bad deal for Americans," and linked to a video which said the agreement "undermines" US competitiveness and jobs, was "badly negotiated" by former president Barack Obama and "accomplishes little." In its surprise response on Friday, France's foreign ministry tweeted, "We've seen the @WhiteHouse video about the #ParisAccord. We disagree - so we've changed it."