How big data can change intensive care

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A team of data scientists, researchers and clinicians from UNSW Sydney have won a major prize at the second annual Healthcare Artificial Intelligence Datathon held at the National University of Singapore (NUS). The two-day event – organised jointly by the National University Health System (NUHS), Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and NUS – hosted more than 200 local and international data scientists and clinicians last weekend to address current problems in healthcare with the latest machine learning and artificial intelligence technologies. The joint UNSW-NUS team won first prize in the Critical Care Track, competing against eight other teams to analyse clinical data contained in the MIT/Philips eICU Collaborative Research Database, comprising information on more than 200,000 patients treated in intensive care units in US hospitals over the past five years. The UNSW-NUS team included researchers Oluwadamisola Sotade, Dr Mark Hanly and Oisin Fitzgerald from UNSW's Centre for Big Data Research in Health, Dr Tim Churches, data scientist from the Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research and UNSW South Western Sydney Clinical School, and Dr Peter Straka from UNSW Mathematics and Statistics. "The installation of next-generation electronic medical records systems in ICUs and throughout hospitals enable very sophisticated machine-learning and artificial intelligence algorithms to be developed to assist busy clinicians in patient care and treatment decision making." said Dr Churches.


Knowledge Discovery in RNA Sequence Families of HIV Using Scalable Computers

AAAI Conferences

The prediction of RNA secondary structure on the basis of sequence information is an important tool in biosequence analysis. However, it has typically been restricted to molecules containing no more than 4000 nucleotides due to the computational complexity of the underlying dynamic programming algorithm used. We desribe here an approach to RNA sequence analysis based upon scalable computers, which enables molecules containing up to 20,000 nucleotides to be analysed.


Big data, big wins in medicine

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An ambitious University of California initiative to create a central repository for clinical data from all six UC health systems is advancing medicine and transforming the process of medical discovery itself. Speaking at UC Health Data Day in San Diego, Atul Butte, M.D., Ph.D., chief data scientist, UC Health, described a new era in biomedical research, driven by the vast amounts of electronic medical record data. "Some are now saying the traditional scientific method of asking questions then making observations is becoming obsolete," Butte said. "We already have a data deluge." Across the UC medical centers, there are billions of data points related to patient care, stored within the UC Health Data Warehouse.


Big Data, Big Wins in Medicine at UC Health

#artificialintelligence

An ambitious University of California initiative to create a central repository for clinical data from all six UC health systems is advancing medicine and transforming the process of medical discovery itself. Speaking at UC Health Data Day in San Diego, Atul Butte, MD, PhD, chief data scientist, UC Health, described a new era in biomedical research, driven by the vast amounts of electronic medical record data. "Some are now saying the traditional scientific method of asking questions then making observations is becoming obsolete," Butte said. "We already have a data deluge." Across the UC medical centers, there are billions of data points related to patient care, stored within the UC Health Data Warehouse.


Biden says big data is key to fight against cancer

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The way Joe Biden tells it, the fight against cancer is in great measure a big data problem. In remarks at an oncology convention in Chicago this week, the vice president delivered a message of open data and interdisciplinary collaboration as keys in the search for better cancer diagnosis and treatment. Biden took the occasion to announce the public availability of the Genomic Data Commons, a repository of the anonymized genomic and clinical data of some 12,000 cancer patients that will open the door for researchers to analyze a broad collection of tumor genome sequences. "It is our hope that Genomic Data Commons will prove pivotal in advancing precision medicine, where physicians attempt to tailor therapies to specific characteristics from a particular patient's cancer," Biden said. "Our aim and the aim of Genomic Data Commons is for researchers to have information at their fingertips about the relationship between abnormalities or mutations of genes and clinical outcomes."