Clooney, in Paris, Jokes About Trump's Paris Comments

U.S. News

"Yes, no one wants to go to Paris anymore because it's horrible here, apparently," Clooney quipped with a smile as he stood next to his wife, Amal, on the red carpet. "Well, we have some things to work on in the United States." He added: "I think you guys have some of the same issues here, so good luck."


Business leaders bash Trump's decision to withdraw from Paris climate accord

Los Angeles Times

President Trump stands next to the podium after speaking about the U.S. role in the Paris climate change accord, Thursday in the Rose Garden of the White House. President Trump stands next to the podium after speaking about the U.S. role in the Paris climate change accord, Thursday in the Rose Garden of the White House. Corporate executives generally shy away from addressing hot-button political issues for fear of alienating customers. But after President Trump announced Thursday that he will withdraw the U.S. from the Paris climate change accord, a who's who of Fortune Magazine cover models took to social media to criticize the decision. Here are the reactions of some of the nation's most prominent business leaders: 'Climate change is an urgent issue' Brad Smith, president of Microsoft Corp., said in a lengthy statement Thursday that the technology giant was "disappointed" with Trump's decision.


Trump Will Withdraw U.S. From Paris Climate Agreement

NYT > Economy

Brad Plumer, a climate reporter for The New York Times, explains the consequences of President Trump's decision today that he will withdraw from the landmark global warming agreement. WASHINGTON -- President Trump announced Thursday that he will withdraw the United States from participation in the Paris climate accord, weakening global efforts to combat climate change and siding with conservatives who argued that the landmark 2015 agreement was harming the economy. But he will stick to the withdrawal process laid out in the Paris agreement, which President Barack Obama joined and most of the world has already ratified. That could take nearly four years to complete, meaning a final decision would be up to the American voters in the next presidential election. Still, Mr. Trump's decision is a remarkable rebuke to fellow heads-of-state, climate activists, corporate executives and members of the president's own staff, all of whom failed this week to change Mr. Trump's mind with an intense, last-minute lobbying blitz.


Trump Pulling U.S. Out of Paris Climate Deal: Source

U.S. News

The decision will put the United States in league with Syria and Nicaragua as the world's only non-participants in the Paris Climate Agreement. It could have sweeping implications for the deal, which relies heavily on the commitment of big polluter nations to reduce emissions of gases scientists blame for sea level rise, droughts and more frequent violent storms.


Could Trump unravel Paris climate change deal?

The Japan Times

PARIS – Diplomats gather next week for a fresh round of U.N. climate talks in Morocco, but all eyes will be on the U.S. where presidential elections may determine the planet's future. Republican nominee Donald Trump, who has described global warming as a "hoax," said in May he would "cancel" the climate-rescue Paris Agreement if elected leader of the free world. The pact, concluded in the French capital last December after years of haggling, came into force on Friday -- its goal to stave off worst-case-scenario global warming. Climate scientists and NGOs have long warned of dire consequences if Trump is elected. On Friday, President Barack Obama warned in an interview with U.S. talk show host Bill Maher that: "All the progress we've made on climate change," among other crux issues, "is going to be on the ballot" next Tuesday.