Cafe opens with robot waiters remotely controlled by people with disabilities

The Japan Times

A cafe featuring robot waiters remotely controlled from home by people with severe physical disabilities has been launched in Minato Ward, Tokyo. Five robots measuring 1.2 meters tall, controlled by people with conditions such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a form of motor neuron disease, took orders and served food as the cafe opened Monday on a trial basis. The cafe will be open until Dec. 7. The OriHime-D robots transmit video images and audio via the internet, allowing their controllers to direct them from home via computer. "(The robots) enable physical work and social participation," said Kentaro Yoshifuji, CEO of Ory Lab Inc., the developer of the robot and one of the three entities organizing the cafe.


Cafe utilizing robot waiters remotely controlled by people with disabilities to open in Tokyo

The Japan Times

A cafe will open in Tokyo's Akasaka district in November featuring robot waiters remotely controlled from home by people with severe physical disabilities. The cafe, which will be open on weekdays between Nov. 26 to Dec. 7, will deploy OriHime-D robots controlled by disabled people with conditions such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, a form of motor neuron disease. The robot waiters, 1.2 meters tall and weighing 20 kg., will transmit video footage and audio via the internet, allowing their controllers to direct them from home via tablets or computers. At an event marking the OriHime-D's debut in August, a robot controlled by Nozomi Murata, who suffers from auto-phagic vacuolar myopathy that causes muscle weakness, asked a family if they would like some chocolate. "I want to create a world in which people who can't move their bodies can work too," said Kentaro Yoshifuji, chief executive officer of Ory Lab. Inc., the developer of the robots.


Personalized "deep learning" equips robots for autism therapy

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Children with autism spectrum conditions often have trouble recognizing the emotional states of people around them -- distinguishing a happy face from a fearful face, for instance. To remedy this, some therapists use a kid-friendly robot to demonstrate those emotions and to engage the children in imitating the emotions and responding to them in appropriate ways. This type of therapy works best, however, if the robot can smoothly interpret the child's own behavior -- whether he or she is interested and excited or paying attention -- during the therapy. Researchers at the MIT Media Lab have now developed a type of personalized machine learning that helps robots estimate the engagement and interest of each child during these interactions, using data that are unique to that child. Armed with this personalized "deep learning" network, the robots' perception of the children's responses agreed with assessments by human experts, with a correlation score of 60 percent, the scientists report June 27 in Science Robotics.


Personalized 'deep learning' equips robots for autism therapy: Machine learning network offers personalized estimates of children's behavior

#artificialintelligence

This type of therapy works best, however, if the robot can smoothly interpret the child's own behavior -- whether he or she is interested and excited or paying attention -- during the therapy. Researchers at the MIT Media Lab have now developed a type of personalized machine learning that helps robots estimate the engagement and interest of each child during these interactions, using data that are unique to that child. Armed with this personalized "deep learning" network, the robots' perception of the children's responses agreed with assessments by human experts, with a correlation score of 60 percent, the scientists report June 27 in Science Robotics. It can be challenging for human observers to reach high levels of agreement about a child's engagement and behavior. Their correlation scores are usually between 50 and 55 percent.


Stephen Hawking warned Artificial Intelligence could end human race

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NEW DELHI: Eminent astrophysicist Stephen Hawking, who died today, had warned that the efforts to develop artificial intelligence (AI) and create thinking machines could spell the end of the human race. Hawking, known for his work on black holes and relativity, was regarded as one of the most brilliant theoretical physicists since Albert Einstein. He was suffering from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, more commonly known as Lou Gehrig's disease since he was 20. Despite being told that he had just two more years to live in 1963, Hawking continued to make path breaking contributions to science till the age of 76. In the last few years, Hawking repeatedly warned about the threat of climate change, artificial intelligence, population burden and hostile aliens.