Goto

Collaborating Authors

the-latest-work-at-indian-container-port-stalled-by-malware

U.S. News

In this March 23, 2016 photo, a worker checks the radiation level on barrels in a storage of nuclear waste taken from the 4th unit destroyed by the 1986 explosion at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant, Chernobyl, Ukraine. A new and highly virulent outbreak of data-scrambling software -- apparently sown in Ukraine -- caused disruption across the world Tuesday, June 27, 2017. The virus hit the radiation-monitoring at Ukraine's shuttered Chernobyl power plant, site of the world's worst nuclear accident, forcing it into manual operation.


The Download: We spoke to a radiation expert in Kyiv about the current nuclear accident risk

MIT Technology Review

Russian troops have been bringing death and destruction to Ukraine since they invaded on February 24. But there's a risk they could cause a nuclear accident too, according to Vadim Chumak, head of the external exposure dosimetry lab at Ukraine's National Research Center for Radiation Medicine in the country's capital, Kyiv. Since Russia took control of two nuclear power plants inside Ukraine earlier this month, reactors inside those plants have been cut off from their power sources, and radiation-monitoring devices have been disconnected, leading to concerns of a potential nuclear disaster. One particular worry is that if a nuclear catastrophe strikes, scientists might not be able to monitor it or measure its impacts, says Vadim Chumak, head of the external exposure dosimetry lab at Ukraine's National Research Center for Radiation Medicine, who played a key role in dose assessment following the Chernobyl disaster. Today, he remains close enough to Kyiv to help should a nuclear disaster result from Russia's invasion. From a house in Ukraine's countryside, just outside the capital, Chumak spoke to MIT Technology Review about his hopes and fears, the risks of radiation leaks from hospitals, and the fact that much of the country's radiation monitoring equipment is obsolete.


The Latest: Work at Indian container port stalled by malware

Associated Press

A computer screen cyberattack warning notice reportedly holding computer files to ransom, as part of a massive international cyberattack, at an office in Kiev, Ukraine, Tuesday June 27, 2017, A new and highly virulent outbreak of malicious data-scrambling software appears to be causing mass disruption across Europe, hitting Ukraine especially hard. Image used with permission of the account holder facebook.com/olejmaa A computer screen cyberattack warning notice reportedly holding computer files to ransom, as part of a massive international cyberattack, at an office in Kiev, Ukraine, Tuesday June 27, 2017, A new and highly virulent outbreak of malicious data-scrambling software appears to be causing mass disruption across Europe, hitting Ukraine especially hard. A new and highly virulent outbreak of data-scrambling software -- apparently sown in Ukraine -- caused disruption across the world Tuesday, June 27, 2017. A highly virulent strain of malicious software that is crippling computers globally appears to have been sown in Ukraine, where it badly hobbled much of the government and private sector on the eve of a holiday celebrating a post-Soviet constitution.


The Latest: Maersk says it has 'contained' cyberattack

Associated Press

Hackers Tuesday June 27, 2017 caused widespread disruption across Europe, hitting Ukraine especially hard. Hackers Tuesday June 27, 2017 caused widespread disruption across Europe, hitting Ukraine especially hard. A computer screen cyberattack warning notice reportedly holding computer files to ransom, as part of a massive international cyberattack, at an office in Kiev, Ukraine, Tuesday June 27, 2017, A new and highly virulent outbreak of malicious data-scrambling software appears to be causing mass disruption across Europe, hitting Ukraine especially hard. A new and highly virulent outbreak of data-scrambling software -- apparently sown in Ukraine -- caused disruption across the world Tuesday, June 27, 2017.


Chernobyl staff denied access to radiation monitoring lab

New Scientist

Scientists monitoring radiation levels at Chernobyl are unable to access their laboratories and instruments because Russian troops control the plant, warns a worker who escaped the facility when it was captured by Russian forces on 24 February. Other staff still running the working power plants on the site are reportedly being held in poor conditions without the chance to take breaks away from the facility to rest. "We continue scientific monitoring as much as possible," says the nuclear expert from the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, who asked to remain anonymous for security reasons. "This is very far from [the] usual volume [of testing] because [my colleagues] have no access to our labs and instruments in Chernobyl, but we do our best in monitoring important values, sometimes by indirect data." The scientist tells New Scientist that all of his team were able to escape the facility and leave the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone on the first day of the invasion.