Yahoo hacked again, more than one billion accounts stolen

ZDNet

Yahoo has disclosed that more than one billion accounts may have been stolen from the company's systems in another cyberattack. Yahoo fixes flaw allowing an attacker to read any user's emails What happened to Yahoo's traffic after it revealed it was hit by hackers? Verizon says Yahoo email hacking could scupper $4.83 billion deal Yahoo'scanned customer emails' under top-secret order Meet the hacker who tries to break Yahoo every day Yahoo fixes flaw allowing an attacker to read any user's emails What happened to Yahoo's traffic after it revealed it was hit by hackers? Verizon says Yahoo email hacking could scupper $4.83 billion deal The company said in a statement Wednesday after the markets closed that unnamed attackers stole the accounts in August 2013, a year prior to a previously disclosed attack, in which attackers stole around 500 million accounts in September 2014. The company wasn't able to identify the intrusion associated with the August 2013 breach.


The 12 biggest hacks, breaches, and security threats of 2017

PCWorld

Security issues took a turn for the serious in 2017. This time around we still suffered the password breaches, malware annoyances, and stolen credit card numbers that have become commonplace in recent years. But the headlines were dominated by more sobering issues.


500 million Yahoo accounts breached

USATODAY

Yahoo's massive data breach could affect hundreds of millions of users. One-time Internet pioneer Yahoo was recently the focus of a bidding war for its core assets, which were scooped up by AOL owner Verizon. SAN FRANCISCO -- Information from at least 500 million Yahoo accounts was stolen from the company in 2014, and the company said Thursday it believes that a state-sponsored actor was behind the hack. The information may have included names, email addresses, telephone numbers, dates of birth, and, in some cases, encrypted or unencrypted security questions and answers, Yahoo said. Claims surfaced in early August that a hacker using the name "Peace" was trying to sell the usernames, passwords and dates of birth of Yahoo account users on the dark web -- a black market of thousands of secret websites.


Yahoo mega breach bares online data's vulnerability, lack of fraud points to state-sponsored hack

The Japan Times

NEW YORK – The revelation of Yahoo's latest hack underscores what many Americans have known for years: All those emails, photos and other personal files stored online can easily be stolen, and there's little anyone can do about it. The only saving grace is that the attackers apparently did not exploit the information for fraud. But their true motives remain a mystery. While there are a number of straightforward measures all users should take to protect themselves, relatively few people actually do. And in this case, doing so wouldn't really have mattered.


Staying Safe Online: Digital Privacy In The Times Of Hacking

International Business Times

About a month ago, Yahoo admitted that hackers had stolen details of over 500 million of its users in 2014. And WikiLeaks has been in the news the last few months as it has been releasing the "Podesta files" -- emails exchanged between John Podesta, the chairman of Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton's campaign, and a large number of Democratic Party leaders, including President Barack Obama. Earlier this month, the U.S. officially blamed Russian hackers for targeting the Democratic Party, and a report in September warned that Russian hackers were targeting dozens of U.S. companies. Celebrities have had their photographs and other personal details stolen from online vaults and U.S. athletes had their medical records released. According to the Federal Trade Commission, there were over 42,000 cases of identity theft in January 2016 alone.