Driving AI's potential in organizations

#artificialintelligence

For some organizations, harnessing artificial intelligence's full potential begins tentatively with explorations of select enterprise opportunities and a few potential use cases. While testing the waters this way may deliver valuable insights, it likely won't be enough to make your company a market maker (rather than a fast follower). To become a true AI-fueled organization, a company may need to fundamentally rethink the way humans and machines interact within working environments. Executives should also consider deploying machine learning and other cognitive tools systematically across every core business process and enterprise operation to support data-driven decision-making. Likewise, AI could drive new offerings and business models. These are not minor steps, but as AI technologies standardize rapidly across industries, becoming an AI-fueled organization will likely be more than a strategy for success--it could be table stakes for survival. In his new book The AI Advantage, Deloitte Analytics senior adviser Thomas H. Davenport describes three stages in the journey that companies can take toward achieving full utilization of artificial intelligence.1 In the first stage, which Davenport calls assisted intelligence, companies harness large-scale data programs, the power of the cloud, and science-based approaches to make data-driven business decisions. Today, companies at the vanguard of the AI revolution are already working toward the next stage--augmented intelligence--in which machine learning (ML) capabilities layered on top of existing information management systems work to augment human analytical competencies. According to Davenport, in the coming years, more companies will progress toward autonomous intelligence, the third AI utilization stage, in which processes are digitized and automated to a degree whereby machines, bots, and systems can directly act upon intelligence derived from them. The journey from the assisted to augmented intelligence stages, and then on to fully autonomous intelligence, is part of a growing trend in which companies transform themselves into "AI-fueled organizations."


Responsible AI takes more than good intentions - TechHQ

#artificialintelligence

Last month, 42 countries signed up to the OECD's common artificial intelligence (AI) principles. Just before that, the European Commission published its own ethics guidelines for trustworthy AI. In fact, to date, there has been a huge amount of work on ethical AI principles, guidelines and standards across different organizations, including IEEE, ISO and the Partnership on AI. On top of these principles, there has been a growing body of work in the fairness, accountability, and transparency machine learning community with a growing number of solutions to tackle bias from a quantitative perspective. Both organizations and governments alike clearly recognize the importance of designing ethics into AI, there's no doubt about that.


9 Developments In AI That You Really Need to Know

#artificialintelligence

Over 6,000 people are attending a conference focusing on artificial intelligence (AI) that opened in Amsterdam this morning. World Summit AI brings together corporates, startups, investors, scientists, academics, NGOs along with government bodies like the UN, EU and the World Economic Forum. Participants will be learning about some of the latest innovations in AI – the creation of human-like technology - that will transform business and the ethical issues that come with it. The event coincides with Artificial Intelligence in Europe, a report by Microsoft that reveals over half of the companies surveyed expect AI to have an impact on "business areas that are entirely unknown today". Yet only 4% of companies actively use AI suggesting European businesses, at least, have an enormous mountain to climb.


9 Developments In AI That You Really Need to Know

#artificialintelligence

Over 6,000 people are attending a conference focusing on artificial intelligence (AI) that opened in Amsterdam this morning. World Summit AI brings together corporates, startups, investors, scientists, academics, NGOs along with government bodies like the UN, EU and the World Economic Forum. Participants will be learning about some of the latest innovations in AI – the creation of human-like technology - that will transform business and the ethical issues that come with it. The event coincides with Artificial Intelligence in Europe, a report by Microsoft that reveals over half of the companies surveyed expect AI to have an impact on "business areas that are entirely unknown today". Yet only 4% of companies actively use AI suggesting European businesses, at least, have an enormous mountain to climb.


A Journey from Island of Knowledge to Mutual Understanding in Global Business Meetings

AAAI Conferences

What are the most important elements to create mutual understanding and make collaborative decisions in creative business meetings? We address this question as a transformative journey from island of knowledge to mutual understanding in the context of collaborative decision making in creative global business meetings. The paper presents: a mutual understanding metric ( MUM ) and method for self assessment and 360 team assessment that define different MUM stages in the journey from island of knowledge to mutual understanding. an engagement Matrix of Choices ( eMOC ) framework to assist cross-disciplinary, global teams to make explicit choices with an understanding of the level of collaboration and engagement they can achieve. We present the eMoc “six steps to engagement” framework that offers three feedback loops as triggers to improve the local and global collaboration context and behavior, and three choice-decision-commitment steps towards improving the work environment and increasing knowledge work productivity. We argue that iterative and continuous MUM assessment, explicit eMOC choices, are central to achieve mutual understanding, high performance teamwork, and eliminate re-work, coordination, and decision wait time. The rapid prototyping and testing observations indicate that MUM and eMoC : Allow team members to build awareness of their local conditions and make their local conditions transparent and visible to the rest of the team. Provide a feedback mechanism that indicates the engagement potential of each team member and the team, as well as a trigger or nudge towards moving to higher levels of engagement.