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Which Confederate statues were removed? A running list

FOX News

After a "Unite the Right" rally in Virginia to protest against the removal of a statue of Robert E. Lee resulted in the death of a woman who was demonstrating against white supremacy, many other cities across America have decided to remove Confederate statues and monuments. Following the violence in Charlottesville, cities are debating whether to remove the controversial monuments, many of which were dedicated in the early twentieth century or during the height of the Civil Rights Movement. Discussions are under way about the removal of monuments in Dallas, Houston, Atlanta, Memphis, Nashville, Pensacola, Florida, Jacksonville, Florida, Lexington, Kentucky, Richmond, Virginia, Birmingham, Alabama, and Charlottesville, Virginia. Under cover of darkness, city workers removed a statue on Aug. 18 of former Supreme Court Justice Roger Taney that had been on the State House's front lawn for 145 years. Taney authored the Supreme Court's 1857 Dred Scott decision, which held that African-Americans could not be U.S. citizens.


Which Confederate statues were removed? A running list

FOX News

Two statues removed from two parks after the city council votes to sell the land to a private entity. More than 25 cities across the United States have removed or relocated Confederate statues and monuments amid an intense nationwide debate about race and history. After a "Unite the Right" rally in Virginia in August to protest against the removal of a statue of Robert E. Lee resulted in the death of a woman who was demonstrating against white supremacy, other cities have decided to remove Confederate statues. Many of the controversial mouments were dedicated in the early twentieth century or during the height of the Civil Rights Movement. Discussions are under way about the removal of monuments in Houston, Atlanta, Nashville, Pensacola, Florida, Jacksonville, Florida, Richmond, Virginia, Birmingham, Alabama, and Charlottesville, Virginia.



Here's Where Confederate Monuments Are Coming Down--And Which Ones Could Be Next

Mother Jones

A protester kicks the toppled statue of a Confederate soldier after it was pulled down in Durham, N.C. Activists used a rope to pull down the monument outside a Durham courthouse. This past weekend's violent protests against the planned removal of a Charlottesville, Virginia, monument commemorating Robert E. Lee by "alt-right" activists and white supremacists--and the counter-protests that opposed those demonstrations--has captured the attention of the entire country. But the effort to take down the symbols that glorify the Confederacy and its leaders are far from new. The tensions in Charlottesville build on a movement that surged after a white supremacist killed nine parishioners at a historically black church in Charleston, S.C. in 2015.


New Orleans is tearing down its Confederate monuments, but the South has plenty of others

Los Angeles Times

Workers dismantle the Liberty Place monument in New Orleans on April 24, 2017. The monument commemorated whites who tried to topple a biracial post-Civil War government. Workers dismantle the Liberty Place monument in New Orleans on April 24, 2017. The monument commemorated whites who tried to topple a biracial post-Civil War government. New Orleans on Monday became the latest of a growing number of Deep South cities to purge its public space of Civil War-era memorials that some say are historically significant and others dismiss as offensive relics of white supremacy.