Synthetic pot cases spike in Illinois, officials warn users may experience 'bleeding from eyes and ears'

FOX News

This photo provided Friday, Aug. 7, 2015 by New York Police Department shows packets of synthetic marijuana seized after a search warrant was served at a newsstand in Brooklyn, N.Y. Emergency rooms in Illinois are noticing a spike in synthetic pot users suffering from "severe bleeding," and state health officials are warning the public to remain vigilant. The Illinois Department of Health (IDPH) issued a statement on Wednesday announcing that at least six people in northeastern Illinois had been hospitalized after using the man-made substance -- also known as "fake weed," "K2" or "spice." On Saturday, the number of cases climbed to 38, including one death, the health department reported. There are now cases in at least eight Chicago-area communities including Cook County, Dupage County, Kane County, McLean County, Peoria County, Tazewell County and Will County.


Synthetic pot cases spike in Illinois, officials warn users may experience 'bleeding from eyes and ears'

FOX News

This photo provided Friday, Aug. 7, 2015 by New York Police Department shows packets of synthetic marijuana seized after a search warrant was served at a newsstand in Brooklyn, N.Y. Emergency rooms in Illinois are noticing a spike in synthetic pot users suffering from "severe bleeding," and state health officials are warning the public to remain vigilant. The Illinois Department of Health (IDPH) issued a statement on Wednesday announcing that at least six people in northeastern Illinois had been hospitalized after using the man-made substance -- also known as "fake weed," "K2" or "spice." On Friday, the number of cases climbed to 32, the health department reported. There are now cases in at least eight Chicago-area communities including Cook County, Dupage County, Kane County, McLean County, Peoria County, Tazewell County and Will County.


Three rural Illinois men charged with Minnesota mosque bombing

The Japan Times

CHICAGO – Federal authorities Tuesday charged three men from rural central Illinois with the bombing of a Minnesota mosque last year and said one of the suspects told an investigator the goal of the attack was to "scare" Muslims out of the United States. A statement from the U.S. attorney's office in Springfield, Illinois, says the men are also suspected in the attempted bombing of an abortion clinic. The Dar Al-Farooq Islamic Center in Bloomington, Minnesota, was bombed just before morning prayers on Aug. 5, causing a fire and extensive damage although no one was injured or killed. And there was an attempted bombing of the Champaign, Illinois, Women's Health Practice on Nov. 7. One of the men, Michael B. Hari, 47, described in an April 2017 Chicago Tribune article how he drafted a $10 billion plan to build a wall along the border with Mexico, citing President Donald Trump's call for such a wall.


Attention turns to affiliations of mosque-bombing suspects

FOX News

CHICAGO – Why three men allegedly chose to travel some 500 miles (805 kilometers) from a rural farming community of less the 100 residents in central Illinois to bomb a particular mosque in suburban Minneapolis isn't clear. But a complaint released as they were charged Tuesday in the 2017 attack on the Dar Al-Farooq Islamic Center includes a chilling comment one suspect allegedly made about their desired effect: They hoped to scare Muslims into leaving the U.S. Attention by investigators, as well as members of the Bloomington, Minnesota, mosque, now turns to the suspects' affiliations and backgrounds and what else these might reveal about their motivations. A statement from the U.S. attorney's office in Springfield, Illinois, says the men also are suspected in the attempted bombing of an abortion clinic. The Dar Al-Farooq Islamic Center in Bloomington, Minnesota, was bombed just before morning prayers on Aug. 5, causing a fire and extensive damage although no one was injured or killed. And there was an attempted bombing of the Champaign, Illinois, Women's Health Practice on Nov. 7.


Convicted Chicago Officer Moved to Western Illinois Jail

U.S. News

Rock Island County Sheriff Berry Bustos tells the Chicago Tribune that Jason Van Dyke arrived Tuesday afternoon to the jail along the Mississippi River. Bustos says Van Dyke will be held in protective custody out of the jail's general population.