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LG explains why robots are too fat finder.com.au

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I recently had the opportunity to travel to South Korea to look over LG's work in both the AI and robotics fields, including some detailed time with its LG CLOi Airport Guide Robot. That's a design that LG has iterated on over time, and I had the chance to sit down for an interview (via a translator) with Hyungjn Choi, LG's Leader of Life support Robot Biz. That's a fancy title to say that he's in charge (in his own words) "of robot business development and product planning" at LG. Robots in industry are nothing new, but people-centric robots are a tough challenge. Mr Choi is quite clear that the first robot was the toughest. "Technically speaking, the most difficult one is the first one that you can see when you arrive (at Seoul's Incheon International Airport), the Airport guide robot.


Why South Korea is an ideal breeding ground for robots

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At Incheon International Airport (ICN), outside South Korea's capital Seoul, a team of congenial staff will help you find your boarding gate or escort you to the nearest lounge. They're well trained, well behaved and quadrilingual to boot – but they're not so good at small talk.


What To Expect From Generation AI?

#artificialintelligence

A young boy communicating with a robot that is on display at Incheon International Airport in Seoul / South Korea. Artificial Intelligence is going to transform the world, changing a lot of things for all categories of people in the process; children will be among the most affected. "You and I live in an age where we're starting to be impacted, but we've spent a lot of our lives not really having interacted with AI. We're also adults that have some volition and agency. For children, it's different," Erica Kochi, co-founder of UNICEF Innovation Unit, tells me.


The airports of the future are here

Mashable

No matter how well-regarded a particular airport happens to be, the slog from curb to cabin is pretty much the same wherever you go. A decades-old paradigm of queues, security screens, snack vendors, and gate-waiting prevails--the only difference is the level of stress. Transiting a modern hub such as Munich or Seoul is more easily endured than threading your way through the perpetual construction zones that pass for airports around New York. The sky portal of the 2040s, however, is likely to be free of such delights. Many of us will be driven to the terminal by autonomous cars; our eyes, faces, and fingers will be scanned; and our bags will have a permanent ID that allows them to be whisked from our homes before we even set out.


KT tests driverless bus at Korean airport

ZDNet

KT has successfully tested an autonomous bus for use in South Korea's airport, the company announced. The telecommunications carrier said its driverless bus covered 2.2 kilometres at a speed of 30 kilometres per hour outside Incheon International Airport's Terminal 1. The bus slowed down at traffic lights and changed lanes to avoid obstacles, the company said, and was inspected by airport employees and those from South Korea's Transportation Ministry during the test. The test was part of KT and the airport's collaboration to develop an'intelligent' airport, the company said. The two will continue to collaborate further in the areas of 5G, artificial intelligence, big data and Internet of Things, KT said.