Goto

Collaborating Authors

Here's what you should know about this year's debate over California's cap-and-trade program

Los Angeles Times

California lawmakers, shown before Gov. Jerry Brown's State of the State speech in January, are tackling a new round of questions about the state's climate policies. California lawmakers, shown before Gov. Jerry Brown's State of the State speech in January, are tackling a new round of questions about the state's climate policies. Battles over climate change policies have become an annual fixture at the state Capitol, and this year appears to be no different. Lawmakers are preparing to decide the future of the cap-and-trade program, the centerpiece of California's battle against global warming. Cap and trade is extremely complex, and so are the politics involved.


Beyond the triumphant rhetoric, Gov. Brown's cap-and-trade plan is stirring up angst

Los Angeles Times

While rolling out their plan to extend California's cap-and-trade program, Gov. Jerry Brown and legislative leaders have portrayed their proposal as a win on two fronts: reaching the state's ambitious climate goals and tackling local air pollution. But beyond the triumphant rhetoric, there is ambivalence about the proposal, largely from progressive lawmakers and environmental advocates. Meanwhile, more conservative legislators and industry groups have stopped short of embracing the plan, throwing the swift passage Brown hoped for in doubt. The reactions to the proposal underscore a key tension in the debate over California's self-styled role as a national and international climate leader, particularly as President Trump slashes environmental regulations in Washington: How to balance aggressive action with broad political appeal. The state is responsible for a tiny fraction of the world's greenhouse gas emissions, meaning its only hope of influencing global warming is modeling policies that can be embraced elsewhere, including in more conservative states.


A new proposal on California's cap-and-trade program emerges as vote is delayed

Los Angeles Times

Here's what you should know about this year's debate over California's cap-and-trade program California lawmakers, shown before Gov. Jerry Brown's State of the State speech in January, are tackling a new round of questions about the state's climate policies. California lawmakers, shown before Gov. Jerry Brown's State of the State speech in January, are tackling a new round of questions about the state's climate policies. Battles over climate change policies have become an annual fixture at the state Capitol, and this year appears to be no different. Lawmakers are preparing to decide the future of the cap-and-trade program, the centerpiece of California's battle against global warming. Cap and trade is extremely complex, and so are the politics involved.


California's new climate change laws almost didn't happen this year. Here's how lawmakers pulled it off.

Los Angeles Times

For Assemblyman Eduardo Garcia, global warming conjured images of stricken polar bears floating away on melting ice sheets, a problem with little relevance to a politician from California's bone-dry Inland Empire. But while attending the United Nations conference on climate change in Paris last year, he heard a new conversation about helping the world's poor, polluted communities -- places that sounded a lot like his own district. "I don't consider myself a climate change activist," the Democrat said. "I consider myself an advocate for my community." But there was a hitch when he returned to Sacramento to push a new propsal.


California lawmakers hope new climate change proposal will help low-income communities harmed by pollution

Los Angeles Times

This is Essential Politics, our daily look at California political and government news. Gen. Eric Holder was in Sacramento Tuesday to meet with Democratic state lawmakers about protecting California's policy interests against the Trump administration. A bill that would provide immigration law resources to public defenders was advanced by an Assembly committee Tuesday . Gen. Xavier Becerra said on Monday that he'd consider legal action to fight any effort by President Trump to cut funding in California, and legislative leaders also criticized Trump's comments . Silicon Valley entrepreneur Peter Thiel, an ally of the president, said he's not interested in running for governor in 2018 .