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Amazon's own 'Machine Learning University' now available to all developers Amazon Web Services

#artificialintelligence

Today, I'm excited to share that, for the first time, the same machine learning courses used to train engineers at Amazon are now available to all developers through AWS. We've been using machine learning across Amazon for more than 20 years. With thousands of engineers focused on machine learning across the company, there are very few Amazon retail pages, products, fulfillment technologies, stores which haven't been improved through the use of machine learning in one way or another. Many AWS customers share this enthusiasm, and our mission has been to take machine learning from something which had previously been only available to the largest, most well-funded technology companies, and put it in the hands of every developer. Thanks to services such as Amazon SageMaker, Amazon Rekognition, Amazon Comprehend, Amazon Transcribe, Amazon Polly, Amazon Translate, and Amazon Lex, tens of thousands of developers are already on their way to building more intelligent applications through machine learning.


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USATODAY

Shares of Amazon hit a major milestone on Monday: $1,000. The retail giant hit the $1,000 mark soon after the markets opened on Monday. Shares have dipped a bit since then, hovering around $997. That's an increase of nearly 40% from this time a year ago.


How authors are gaming Amazon's algorithms with 3000-page books

New Scientist

Romance fans browsing Amazon for their latest steamy read are increasingly being offered virtual door-stoppers at bargain basement prices. But some authors say these self-published ebooks, which run for thousands of pages, are a money-making scam designed to exploit Amazon's algorithms. Amazon's Kindle Unlimited service, which gives people unrestricted access to a selection of books for a monthly fee, pays authors based on the number of pages read, up to a maximum of 3000.


Amazon bans 'incentivized' reviews

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

The Amazon logo is seen on the new logistics center of online merchant Amazon in France. Amazon is a major presence in online retail overseas, with the United Kingdom, German and Japan being its largest non-U.S. SAN FRANCISCO - You may find you can trust reviews on Amazon more going forward after the company announced Monday it was banning "incentivized" reviews. Those are ones in which the reviewer gets free merchandize in return for reviewing a product. Under new guidelines, "creating, modifying, or posting content in exchange for compensation of any kind (including free or discounted products) or on behalf of anyone else," is now prohibited, Amazon's Community Guidelines now reads.


Amazon can now deliver packages to the trunk of your car

Mashable

Amazon is taking its relationship with its customers to the next level. On Tuesday, Amazon announced that it is extending its Amazon Key delivery service from homes to personal vehicles. With Amazon Key In-Car, Amazon couriers will be able to deliver packages inside signed up customers' cars. It is enabled in 2015 or newer General Motors or Volvo vehicles equipped with cloud-connected technologies (OnStar and Volvo on Call, respectively). It's only accessible to Prime members, and it has launched in 37 cities; Amazon customers can check whether they qualify here.