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Bumble 'swipes left' on Match Group's lawsuit allegations

Engadget

Match Group, which owns Tinder, Match.com and OKCupid, recently filed a lawsuit against Bumble, claiming that its rival violated two of its patents. Now Bumble has clapped back. In an open letter published on its website, Bumble says in no uncertain terms that it believes the lawsuit to be an extension of Match's ongoing attempts to acquire it and calls the lawsuit "baseless." "We swipe left on you. We swipe left on your multiple attempts to buy us, copy us and, now, to intimidate us," Bumble said in its letter.


Bumble responds to Match's patent lawsuit

#artificialintelligence

Yesterday we reported that Match, the parent company of Tinder, was suing Bumble for patent infringement and misuse of intellectual property. Specifically, Match alleged that Bumble "copied Tinder's world-changing, card-swipe-based, mutual opt-in premise" for which a patent was filed in 2013 (before Bumble was founded) but just granted a few months ago. Today Bumble has responded to Match's lawsuit with a letter published on their own blog and other news outlets. The full letter is linked here and we'll also include it in full at the bottom of this post. Interestingly, Bumble's letter focuses less on the actual litigation and instead attempts to fill in readers about the context in which Match has decided to sue over this patent claim.


The Tinder-Bumble Feud: Dating Apps Fight Over Who Owns The Swipe

NPR Technology

Match says its lawsuit is anything but baseless -- detailing, in hundreds of pages of court documents, numerous similarities between the two apps. In the process, Match has accused Bumble of "almost every type of [intellectual property] infringement you could think of," says Sarah Burstein, a professor at the University of Oklahoma College of Law whose research focuses on design patents. One of the central questions revolves around Tinder's patented system for connecting people over the Internet. The matching is based on mutual interest, as expressed through a swiping motion.


Bumble wants you to know that it's definitely not a hookup app

Mashable

Whatever you do, do not call Bumble a hookup app. The dating app appears to be doubling down on branding itself as a destination for finding "empowered and lasting connections," rather than "hookups." SEE ALSO: Bumble counters Tinder's parent company lawsuit on patent infringement A new survey of Bumble's users reveals that 85 percent say they're "looking for marriage or a boyfriend/girlfriend." The survey also found that less than 4 percent of men and less than 1 percent of women on the app "are looking for a hookup," and 25 percent of users say they "went on a first date with someone they met on Bumble in the last month." The survey results also play up the popular dating app's defining feature -- that only women users can start conversations with matches -- as an example of how the app has "empowered" women in online dating. "Female Bumble users are empowered and ready to make the first move.


Bumble counters Tinder's parent company lawsuit on patent infringement

Mashable

Bumble has filed a counter lawsuit against Tinder's parent company Match Group. The move comes in response to Match Group's lawsuit accusing Bumble of patent infringement, specifically with swipe-based matching (see patent) and undoing a "left" swipe. It may seem like a movie plot, but no, this is real life. We've entered the war of the dating apps. SEE ALSO: Bumble buys full-page ad to call out Match Group's'scare tactics' Match Group owns Tinder, along with Match.com,