Ban Aimed at Electronics in Cabins of Some US-Bound Flights

U.S. News

A U.S. official told The Associated Press the ban will apply to nonstop flights to the U.S. from 10 international airports serving the cities of Cairo in Egypt; Amman in Jordan; Kuwait City in Kuwait; Casablanca in Morocco; Doha in Qatar; Riyadh and Jeddah in Saudi Arabia; Istanbul in Turkey; and Abu Dhabi and Dubai in the United Arab Emirates. The ban was indefinite, said the official.


The Latest: Emirates Unaware of Laptop Ban on US Flights

U.S. News

A U.S. official told The Associated Press the ban will apply to nonstop flights to the U.S. from 10 international airports serving the cities of Cairo in Egypt; Amman in Jordan; Kuwait City in Kuwait; Casablanca in Morocco; Doha in Qatar; Riyadh and Jeddah in Saudi Arabia; Istanbul in Turkey; and Abu Dhabi and Dubai in the United Arab Emirates.


Electronic devices banned on US-bound flights from 8 countries

New Scientist

Passengers travelling to the US on flights from eight different countries will be banned from carrying laptops, iPads, cameras and most other electronics in their carry-on luggage. The reason for the ban is not immediately clear. The ban was revealed on Monday in statements from Royal Jordanian Airlines and the official news agency of Saudi Arabia. It will apply to non-stop flights to the US from 10 international airports serving the cities of Cairo in Egypt; Amman in Jordan; Kuwait City in Kuwait; Casablanca in Morocco; Doha in Qatar; Riyadh and Jeddah in Saudi Arabia; Istanbul in Turkey; and Abu Dhabi and Dubai in the United Arab Emirates, according to a US official. Royal Jordanian said mobile phones and medical devices were excluded from the ban.


2018 finds Japan walking tightrope with Pyongyang, Seoul, Beijing -- and Trump

The Japan Times

Last month the kanji kita (north) was selected as the character best symbolizing the social issues of 2017 in Japan, as North Korea's missile and nuclear weapon threats were a constant challenge to the nation's security and diplomacy throughout the year.


Iraqi Kurds cast independence vote in defiance of threats and opposition from Ankara, Baghdad, Tehran

The Japan Times

IRBIL, IRAQ/SULAIMANIA IRAQ – Kurds voted in large numbers in an independence referendum in northern Iraq on Monday, ignoring pressure from Baghdad, threats from Turkey and Iran, and international warnings that the vote may ignite yet more regional conflict. The vote organized by Kurdish authorities is expected to deliver a comfortable "yes" for independence, but is not binding. However, it is designed to give Masoud Barzani, who heads the Kurdistan Regional Government (KRG), a mandate to negotiate the secession of the oil-producing region. Turnout was 76 percent an hour before voting closed, the Kurdish Rudaw TV station said, later adding that vote counting had started. Final results are expected within 72 hours.