Artificial intelligence doesn't require burdensome regulation

#artificialintelligence

One of the most important issues that Congress will face in 2018 is how and when to regulate our growing dependence on artificial intelligence (AI). During the U.S. National Governors Association summer meetings, Elon Musk urged the group to push forward with regulation "before it's too late," stating that AI was an "existential threat to humanity."


Artificial intelligence doesn't require burdensome regulation

#artificialintelligence

One of the most important issues that Congress will face in 2018 is how and when to regulate our growing dependence on artificial intelligence (AI). During the U.S. National Governors Association summer meetings, Elon Musk urged the group to push forward with regulation "before it's too late," stating that AI was an "existential threat to humanity."


Artificial intelligence doesn't require burdensome regulation

#artificialintelligence

One of the most important issues that Congress will face in 2018 is how and when to regulate our growing dependence on artificial intelligence (AI). During the U.S. National Governors Association summer meetings, Elon Musk urged the group to push forward with regulation "before it's too late," stating that AI was an "existential threat to humanity." Hyperbole aside, there are legitimate concerns about the technology and its use. But a rush to regulation could exacerbate current issues, or create new issues that we're not prepared to deal with along the way. To begin with, one of the biggest issues in the world of AI is the lack of clear definition for what the technology is -- and is not.


Should the Government Regulate Artificial Intelligence?

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Artificial intelligence brings tremendous opportunity for business and society. But it has also created fear that letting computers make decisions could cause serious problems that might need to be addressed sooner rather than later. Broadly speaking, AI refers to computers mimicking intelligent behavior, crunching big data to make judgments on everything from how to avoid car accidents to where the next crime might happen. If a computer consistently denies a loan to members of a certain sex or race, is that discrimination? Will regulators have the right to examine the algorithm that made the decision?


AI regulation stirs as unrestricted AI booms in China

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Overinnovation can be a distinct problem, and it may be infecting the fast-growing and competitive AI industry, said Shawn Rogers, senior director of global enablement, digital content and analytic strategy at integration and analytics vendor Tibco Software Inc. Businesses in just about every sector are deploying AI and intelligent automation in their workflows, and a growing number of vendors sell AI products and services. As AI users and AI vendors seek to beat the competition by offering the latest and the best, they risk overinnovating -- knowingly or inadvertently sacrificing safe and ethical practices to better meet the perceived needs of their clients. An AI user, for example, may replace human workers with automated ones or use a recommendation system that provides more personalized choices to customers but collects and uses more of their information. Conversely, an AI vendor might train a machine learning model with biased data or create AI-assisted healthcare software that doesn't comply with the HIPAA privacy standards established under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act. President Donald Trump has now ordered U.S. government agencies to develop new regulatory approaches on AI.